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Open AccessArticle

Response to Sulfur Dioxide Addition by Two Commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains

1
Department of Biology, The University of British Columbia, Kelowna, BC V1V 2J4, Canada
2
School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, The University of Adelaide, Urrbrae, SA 5064, Australia
3
Australian Research Council Training Centre for Innovative Wine Production, Adelaide, SA 5064, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Fermentation 2019, 5(3), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation5030069
Received: 27 June 2019 / Revised: 24 July 2019 / Accepted: 26 July 2019 / Published: 27 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wine Fermentation 2.0)
Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is an antioxidant and antimicrobial agent used in winemaking. Its effects on spoilage microorganisms has been studied extensively, but its effects on commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, the dominant yeast in winemaking, require further investigation. To our knowledge, no previous studies have investigated both the potential SO2 resistance mechanisms of commercial yeasts as well as their production of aroma-active volatile compounds in response to SO2. To study this, fermentations of two commercial yeast strains were conducted in the presence (50 mg/L) and absence (0 mg/L) of SO2. Strain QA23 was more sensitive to SO2 than Strain BRL97, resulting in delayed cell growth and slower fermentation. BRL97 exhibited a more rapid decrease in free SO2, a higher initial production of hydrogen sulfide, and a higher production of acetaldehyde, suggesting that each strain may utilize different mechanisms of sulfite resistance. SO2 addition did not affect the production of aroma-active volatile compounds in QA23, but significantly altered the volatile profiles of the wines fermented by BRL97. View Full-Text
Keywords: wine yeast; wine chemistry; HS-SPME GC-MS; principal coordinate analysis; fermentation; sulfur dioxide wine yeast; wine chemistry; HS-SPME GC-MS; principal coordinate analysis; fermentation; sulfur dioxide
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MDPI and ACS Style

Morgan, S.C.; Haggerty, J.J.; Johnston, B.; Jiranek, V.; Durall, D.M. Response to Sulfur Dioxide Addition by Two Commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains. Fermentation 2019, 5, 69.

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