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A Control Alternative for the Hidden Enemy in the Wine Cellar

1
Departamento en Ciencia y Tecnología de los Alimentos, Facultad Tecnológica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Santiago 9170201, Chile
2
Departamento de Biología, Facultad de Química y Biología, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Santiago 9170201, Chile
3
Departamento de Tecnologías Industriales, Facultad Tecnológica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Alameda 3363, Estación Central, Santiago 9170201, Chile
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Fermentation 2019, 5(1), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation5010025
Received: 21 December 2018 / Revised: 15 February 2019 / Accepted: 28 February 2019 / Published: 6 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enological Repercussions of Non-Saccharomyces Species)
Brettanomyces bruxellensis has been described as the principal spoilage yeast in the winemaking industry. To avoid its growth, wine is supplemented with SO2, which has been questioned due to its potential harm to health. For this reason, studies are being focused on searching for, ideally, natural new antifungals. On the other hand, it is known that in wine production there are a variety of microorganisms, such as yeasts and bacteria, that are possible biological controls. Thus, it has been described that some microorganisms produce antimicrobial peptides, which might control yeast and bacteria populations. Our laboratory has described the Candida intermedia LAMAP1790 strain as a natural producer of antimicrobial compounds against food spoilage microorganisms, as is B. bruxellensis, without affecting the growth of S. cerevisiae. We have demonstrated the proteinaceous nature of the antimicrobial compound and its low molecular mass (under 10 kDa). This is the first step to the possible use of C. intermedia as a selective bio-controller of the contaminant yeast in the winemaking industry. View Full-Text
Keywords: antimicrobial peptides; biocontrol; Brettanomyces bruxellensis; Candida intermedia; wine; off-flavors antimicrobial peptides; biocontrol; Brettanomyces bruxellensis; Candida intermedia; wine; off-flavors
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Peña, R.; Chávez, R.; Rodríguez, A.; Ganga, M.A. A Control Alternative for the Hidden Enemy in the Wine Cellar. Fermentation 2019, 5, 25.

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