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Monoclonal Antibodies as Tools to Combat Fungal Infections
Open AccessReview

Immunotherapy against Systemic Fungal Infections Based on Monoclonal Antibodies

1
Biomedical Sciences Institute, Department of Microbiology, University of São Paulo, Sao Paulo 05508-000, Brazil
2
Tropical Medicine Institute, Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo 05403-000, Brazil
3
Departments of Medicine (Division of Infectious Diseases) and Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY 10461, USA
4
Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, Federal University of São Paulo, Sao Paulo 04021-001, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Fungi 2020, 6(1), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof6010031
Received: 5 January 2020 / Revised: 22 February 2020 / Accepted: 25 February 2020 / Published: 29 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antifungal Immunity and Fungal Vaccine Development)
The increasing incidence in systemic fungal infections in humans has increased focus for the development of fungal vaccines and use of monoclonal antibodies. Invasive mycoses are generally difficult to treat, as most occur in vulnerable individuals, with compromised innate and adaptive immune responses. Mortality rates in the setting of our current antifungal drugs remain excessively high. Moreover, systemic mycoses require prolonged durations of antifungal treatment and side effects frequently occur, particularly drug-induced liver and/or kidney injury. The use of monoclonal antibodies with or without concomitant administration of antifungal drugs emerges as a potentially efficient treatment modality to improve outcomes and reduce chemotherapy toxicities. In this review, we focus on the use of monoclonal antibodies with experimental evidence on the reduction of fungal burden and prolongation of survival in in vivo disease models. Presently, there are no licensed monoclonal antibodies for use in the treatment of systemic mycoses, although the potential of such a vaccine is very high as indicated by the substantial promising results from several experimental models. View Full-Text
Keywords: therapeutic vaccines; monoclonal antibodies; systemic fungal infections; immunotherapy; antifungal vaccines; passive immunization therapeutic vaccines; monoclonal antibodies; systemic fungal infections; immunotherapy; antifungal vaccines; passive immunization
MDPI and ACS Style

Boniche, C.; Rossi, S.A.; Kischkel, B.; Vieira Barbalho, F.; Nogueira D’Aurea Moura, Á.; Nosanchuk, J.D.; Travassos, L.R.; Pelleschi Taborda, C. Immunotherapy against Systemic Fungal Infections Based on Monoclonal Antibodies. J. Fungi 2020, 6, 31.

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