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Review

Chemical Migration from Beverage Packaging Materials—A Review

Fraunhofer Institute for Process Engineering and Packaging IVV, Giggenhauser Straße 35, 85354 Freising, Germany
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Beverages 2020, 6(2), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages6020037
Received: 3 March 2020 / Revised: 3 May 2020 / Accepted: 26 May 2020 / Published: 2 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wide World of Beverage Research: Reviews of Current Topics)
The packaging of a beverage is an essential element for customer convenience and the preservation of beverage quality. On the other hand, chemical compounds present in the packaging materials, either intentionally added or non-intentionally, may be transferred to the food. With a huge variety of materials used in the production, beverage packaging requires safety assessments with respect to the migration of packaging compounds into the filled beverages. The present article deals with potential migrants from different materials for beverage packaging, including PET bottles, glass bottles, metal cans and cardboard multilayers. The list of migrants comprises monomers and additives, oligomers or degradation products. The article presents a review on scientific literature and summarizes European food regulatory requirements. The review shows no evidence of critical substances migrating from packaging into beverages. Testing the migration in real beverages during and at the end of the shelf life shows compliance with the specific migration limits. Accelerated testing using food simulants, however, shows higher migration in some cases, especially at high temperatures in ethanolic simulants. For some migrants, more realistic testing conditions should be applied in order to show compliance with their specific migration limits. View Full-Text
Keywords: migration testing; food simulants; food law compliance; PET bottles; glass bottles; beverage cans; cardboard packaging migration testing; food simulants; food law compliance; PET bottles; glass bottles; beverage cans; cardboard packaging
MDPI and ACS Style

Schmid, P.; Welle, F. Chemical Migration from Beverage Packaging Materials—A Review. Beverages 2020, 6, 37. https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages6020037

AMA Style

Schmid P, Welle F. Chemical Migration from Beverage Packaging Materials—A Review. Beverages. 2020; 6(2):37. https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages6020037

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schmid, Petra, and Frank Welle. 2020. "Chemical Migration from Beverage Packaging Materials—A Review" Beverages 6, no. 2: 37. https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages6020037

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