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Open AccessReview

Grape Infusions: The Flavor of Grapes and Health-Promoting Compounds in Your Tea Cup

1
CQ-VR, Department of Biology and Environment, School of Life Sciences and Environment, Enology Building, Chemistry Research Centre, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro (UTAD), 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
2
CITAB, Department of Biology and Environment, School of Life Sciences and Environment, Centre for the Research and Technology of Agro-Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Beverages 2019, 5(3), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages5030048
Received: 8 May 2019 / Revised: 3 June 2019 / Accepted: 4 July 2019 / Published: 1 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Activity Research and Bioactive Compounds in Beverages)
Traditionally, tea, a beverage made from the processed leaves of the tea plant, Camellia sinensis, and herbal infusions have been primarily consumed for their pleasant taste. Nowadays, they are also consumed because they contain nutraceutical compounds, such as polyphenols. Grapes and grape/wine sub-products such as non-fermented/semi-fermented or fermented grapes, skins, and seeds are a rich source of health-promoting compounds, presenting a great potential for the development of new beverages. Therefore, these grape/wine sub-products are used in the beverage sector for the preparation of infusions, tisanes, and decoctions. Besides polyphenols, fermented grapes, skins, and seeds, usually discarded as waste, are enriched with other health-promoting/nutraceutical compounds, such as melatonin, glutathione, and trehalose, among others, which are produced by yeasts during alcoholic fermentation. In this review, we summarize the benefits of drinking herbal infusions and discuss the potential application of some grapevine fermentation waste products in the production of healthy beverages that we can call grape infusions. View Full-Text
Keywords: infusions; tea; tisanes; grape sub-products valorization; nutraceutical properties; human health infusions; tea; tisanes; grape sub-products valorization; nutraceutical properties; human health
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MDPI and ACS Style

Vilela, A.; Pinto, T. Grape Infusions: The Flavor of Grapes and Health-Promoting Compounds in Your Tea Cup. Beverages 2019, 5, 48.

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