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Logistics, Volume 3, Issue 3 (September 2019)

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Open AccessArticle
New Logistics Paradigms in Poland
Logistics 2019, 3(3), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/logistics3030019 - 25 Jul 2019
Viewed by 322
Abstract
This article presents the results of theoretical and empirical studies on the search for new logistics development paradigms needed to meet the challenges of the twenty-first century global economy. The author reviews the major factors determining the effectiveness of international processes and operations, [...] Read more.
This article presents the results of theoretical and empirical studies on the search for new logistics development paradigms needed to meet the challenges of the twenty-first century global economy. The author reviews the major factors determining the effectiveness of international processes and operations, including logistics success potentials in supply chains. Furthermore, the article proposes methods for measuring logistics performance, specifically the logit model and the model of fuzzy logic, which could be used to assess whether a firm’s planned investments in logistics infrastructure will end in success or failure. The article also evaluates the impact of logistics on the development of international trade in the practice of Polish firms. The studies cover a period before Poland’s accession to the European Union (EU) (2000 to 2004), and after the accession, from 2005 to 2016, and are supplemented with a forecast for logistics development in Polish firms until 2020. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Design and Analysis of a Lightweight Composite Shipping Container Made of Carbon Fiber Laminates
Logistics 2019, 3(3), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/logistics3030018 - 16 Jul 2019
Viewed by 1460
Abstract
The literature indicates that a 20% reduction in the weight of empty 40-foot shipping containers would result in $28 billion of fuel savings, along with a 3.6 exajoule reduction in the energy demand over containers’ 15-year lifetime. Decreasing the energy demand and thereby [...] Read more.
The literature indicates that a 20% reduction in the weight of empty 40-foot shipping containers would result in $28 billion of fuel savings, along with a 3.6 exajoule reduction in the energy demand over containers’ 15-year lifetime. Decreasing the energy demand and thereby greenhouse gas emissions by utilizing lightweight shipping containers has been an unexplored strategy. In this regard, this study investigates the possibility of further reducing the weight of an empty container without compromising the structural integrity, strength, and function of a traditional steel container. This research finds that up to an 80% reduction in weight is possible by producing shipping containers with composite materials. This research presents the new design of a 40-foot container made of carbon fiber laminates. The tare weight of a traditional 40-foot shipping container is around 3750 kg. On the contrary, in this research, the weight of a composite design of the same container is calculated to be around 822 kg. Additional tests with various loads, such as lifting the container and stacking loads onto the composite container, are performed to explore the strength and buckling issues of the design presented in this study. The analyses reveal that the composite shipping container is a highly promising candidate for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, providing fuel savings and thus reducing the operational costs of transportation. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Probability Density Functions for Travel Times in One-Dimensional and Taxicab Service Zones Parameterized by the Maximal Travel Duration of the S/R Machine Within the Zone
Logistics 2019, 3(3), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/logistics3030017 - 02 Jul 2019
Viewed by 392
Abstract
Travel times for simple trips and cycles are analyzed for a storage/retrieval machine working in a one-dimensional or two-dimensional zone with taxicab geometry. A semi-random trip is defined as one-way travel from a known to a random location or vice versa. A random [...] Read more.
Travel times for simple trips and cycles are analyzed for a storage/retrieval machine working in a one-dimensional or two-dimensional zone with taxicab geometry. A semi-random trip is defined as one-way travel from a known to a random location or vice versa. A random trip is defined as one-way travel from a random to another random location. The probability density function (PDF) of the travelling time for a semi-random trip in a one-dimensional zone is expressed analytically for all possible locations of its starting point. The PDF of a random trip within the same zone is found as a marginal probability by considering all possible durations for such travel. Then the PDFs for the travel times of single command (SC) and dual command (DC) cycles are obtained by scaling the PDF for the travel time of a semi-random trip (for SC) and as the maximum travel time of two independent semi-random trips (for DC). PDFs for travel times in a two-dimensional service zone with taxicab geometry are calculated by considering the trip as a superposition of two one-dimensional trips. The PDFs for travel times of SC and DC cycles are calculated in the same way. Both the one-dimensional and the two-dimensional service zones are analyzed in the time domain without normalization. The PDFs for all travel times are expressed in an analytical form parameterized by the maximal possible travel time within the zone. The graphs of all PDFs are illustrated by numerical examples. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Integrating Biomass Conversion Technologies with Recovery Operations In-Woods: Modeling Supply Chain
Logistics 2019, 3(3), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/logistics3030016 - 01 Jul 2019
Viewed by 405
Abstract
Economic potential of feedstock generated low-valued forest residue can be enhanced by emerging biomass conversion technologies (BCT), such as torrefaction, briquetting, and gasification. However, for implementing these emerging processes within the woods, several hurdles are to be overcome, among which a balanced supply [...] Read more.
Economic potential of feedstock generated low-valued forest residue can be enhanced by emerging biomass conversion technologies (BCT), such as torrefaction, briquetting, and gasification. However, for implementing these emerging processes within the woods, several hurdles are to be overcome, among which a balanced supply chain is pivotal. Centralized biomass recovery operation (CBRO) could be an economically viable solution in accessing harvesting sites and allows integration of BCT into forest management. The goal of this study was to examine the logistic effects of integrating a BCT into a CBRO, under different in-wood scenarios based on variations in travel time between the facility locations, amount of raw materials handled, intermediate storage capacity, and duration (number of days) of annual operations. Specific objectives included analyzing the effects of forest residue recoverability (BDMT, bone dry metric ton/ha), total transportation time from the harvest unit to the market, and the annual number of in-woods production sites on the overall efficiency of the BCT operations. Concurrently, this study examined the forest managerial impacts due to such an integration. Location-allocation tool (maximize market share problem type) within the ArcGIS Network Analyst platform was utilized to model the scenarios and generate one-way travel times from the harvest site to final markets. Results from geospatial analysis showed that there were 89–159 and 64–136 suitable locations for the BCT for logistics model (LM) I and II, respectively. Total one-way travel time for all the models ranged between 1.0–1.7 h. Additionally, the annual numbers of BCT sites was inversely proportional to the total one-way travel time (i.e., harvest unit to market). Arranging CBRO and BCT operations to occur at the same in-woods site returned shorter total and average travel times than arranging the two activities at separate in-woods sites. The model developed for this study can be used by forest managers and entrepreneurs to identify sites for placing BCTs in the forest that minimizes transportation times. Full article
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