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Open AccessArticle

Protection of Wine from Protein Haze Using Schizosaccharomyces japonicus Polysaccharides

1
Department of Agriculture, Food, Environment and Forestry (DAGRI)—University of Florence, P.le delle Cascine 18, 50144 Florence, Italy
2
Department of Chemistry “Ugo Schiff” and Center for Colloid and Surface Science (CSGI)—University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2020, 9(10), 1407; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101407
Received: 23 August 2020 / Revised: 24 September 2020 / Accepted: 29 September 2020 / Published: 3 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wine Proteins and Peptides)
Nowadays commercial preparations of yeast polysaccharides (PSs), in particular mannoproteins, are widely used for wine colloidal and tartrate salt stabilization. In this context, the industry has developed different processes for the isolation and purification of PSs from the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This yeast releases limited amounts of mannoproteins in the growth medium, thus making their direct isolation from the culture broth not economically feasible. On the contrary, Schizosaccharomyces japonicus, a non-Saccharomyces yeast isolated from wine, releases significant amounts of PSs during the alcoholic fermentation. In the present work, PSs released by Sch. japonicus were recovered from the growth medium by ultrafiltration and their impact on the wine colloidal stability was evaluated. Interestingly, these PSs contribute positively to the wine protein stability. The visible haziness of the heat-treated wine decreases as the concentration of added PSs increases. Gel electrophoresis results of the haze and of the supernatant after the heat stability test are consistent with the turbidity measurements. Moreover, particle size distributions of the heat-treated wines, as obtained by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), show a reduction in the average dimension of the protein aggregates as the concentration of added PSs increases. View Full-Text
Keywords: wine protein; wine haze; protein stability test; protein stability treatment; mannoprotein; polysaccharide; Schizosaccharomyces japonicus; non-Saccharomyces wine protein; wine haze; protein stability test; protein stability treatment; mannoprotein; polysaccharide; Schizosaccharomyces japonicus; non-Saccharomyces
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MDPI and ACS Style

Millarini, V.; Ignesti, S.; Cappelli, S.; Ferraro, G.; Adessi, A.; Zanoni, B.; Fratini, E.; Domizio, P. Protection of Wine from Protein Haze Using Schizosaccharomyces japonicus Polysaccharides. Foods 2020, 9, 1407. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101407

AMA Style

Millarini V, Ignesti S, Cappelli S, Ferraro G, Adessi A, Zanoni B, Fratini E, Domizio P. Protection of Wine from Protein Haze Using Schizosaccharomyces japonicus Polysaccharides. Foods. 2020; 9(10):1407. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101407

Chicago/Turabian Style

Millarini, Valentina; Ignesti, Simone; Cappelli, Sara; Ferraro, Giovanni; Adessi, Alessandra; Zanoni, Bruno; Fratini, Emiliano; Domizio, Paola. 2020. "Protection of Wine from Protein Haze Using Schizosaccharomyces japonicus Polysaccharides" Foods 9, no. 10: 1407. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101407

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