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Article

From By-Product to the Food Chain: Melon (Cucumis melo L.) Seeds as Potential Source for Oils

1
Higher Technical School of Agricultural and Forestry Engineering, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Campus Universitario s/n, 02071 Albacete, Spain
2
REQUIMTE/LAQV, Department of Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, R. Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, 228, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2020, 9(10), 1341; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101341
Received: 19 August 2020 / Revised: 14 September 2020 / Accepted: 17 September 2020 / Published: 23 September 2020
Fruit-processing industries annually discard large volumes of fruit by-products. Thousands of tons of melon seeds could be recovered through the year from melon production. These seeds are an excellent source of vegetable oil with significant health-promoting properties due to their unsaturated fatty acid profile and high content of specific bioactive compounds. However, little information exists about the influence of melon cultivars and oil-extraction methods on oil characteristics. In this study, oils from nine different melon cultivars were evaluated. Additionally, two oil-extraction methods (screw and hydraulic press) were studied. Results showed that melon seeds may be used as a novel source of healthy oils. Higher-quality oils were obtained with the hydraulic press; however, low yields reduced industrial interest in this method. Oils extracted from the different cultivars showed high variability in the content of linoleic (51–69%) and oleic (15–34%) acids. Regarding vitamin E, γ-tocopherol was the main isoform found in melon-seed oils (99.81–456.73 mg/kg), followed by α- and δ-tocopherols. Significant concentrations of tocotrienols (α, β, and γ) were also found. Although all cultivars showed positive attributes, principal-component analysis (PCA) showed that Honey Dew and Blanco de Ribatejo could be specifically considered as a potential source of polyunsaturated oils with high concentrations of vitamin E. View Full-Text
Keywords: melon-seed oil; fruit waste; tocopherols; tocotrienols; unsaturated fatty acids; screw press melon-seed oil; fruit waste; tocopherols; tocotrienols; unsaturated fatty acids; screw press
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rabadán, A.; Nunes, M.A.; Bessada, S.M.F.; Pardo, J.E.; Oliveira, M.B.P.P.; Álvarez-Ortí, M. From By-Product to the Food Chain: Melon (Cucumis melo L.) Seeds as Potential Source for Oils. Foods 2020, 9, 1341. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101341

AMA Style

Rabadán A, Nunes MA, Bessada SMF, Pardo JE, Oliveira MBPP, Álvarez-Ortí M. From By-Product to the Food Chain: Melon (Cucumis melo L.) Seeds as Potential Source for Oils. Foods. 2020; 9(10):1341. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101341

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rabadán, Adrián, M. Antónia Nunes, Silvia M. F. Bessada, José E. Pardo, M. Beatriz P. P. Oliveira, and Manuel Álvarez-Ortí. 2020. "From By-Product to the Food Chain: Melon (Cucumis melo L.) Seeds as Potential Source for Oils" Foods 9, no. 10: 1341. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101341

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