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Open AccessArticle

Effect of Non-Conventional Drying Methods on In Vitro Starch Digestibility Assessment of Cooked Potato Genotypes

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School of Human Nutrition, McGill University, 21,111 Lakeshore, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9, Canada
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Bioresource Engineering, McGill University, 21,111 Lakeshore, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9, Canada
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Plant Science Department, McGill University, 21,111 Lakeshore, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9, Canada
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Faculty of Engineering, Institut de recherche et de développement en agroenvironnement (IRDA), 2700, rue Einstein, Québec, QC G1P 3W8, Canada
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Soil and Agricultural Engineering Department, Laval University, 2425 rue de l’Agriculture, Québec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2019, 8(9), 382; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8090382
Received: 29 June 2019 / Revised: 16 August 2019 / Accepted: 20 August 2019 / Published: 2 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foods of Plant Origin)
Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) are a good dietary source of carbohydrates in the form of digestible starch (DS) and resistant starch (RS). As increased RS content consumption can be associated with decreased chronic disease risk, breeding efforts have focused on identifying potato varieties with higher RS content, which requires high-throughput analysis of starch profiles. For this purpose, freeze drying of potatoes has been used but this approach leads to inaccurate RS values. The present study objective was to assess the starch content (RS, DS and total starch (TS)) of three cooked potato genotypes that were dried using freeze drying and innovative drying techniques (microwave vacuum drying, instant controlled pressure drop drying and conductive hydro-drying) relative to freshly cooked potato samples. Depending on the genotype, all drying methods showed one or more starch measures that were significantly different from freshly cooked values. The combination of ultrasound and infrared assisted conductive hydro-drying was the only method identified to be associated with accurate assessment of DS and TS content relative to fresh samples. The drying treatments were all generally associated with highly variable RS content relative to fresh controls. We conclude that freshly cooked samples must be used for selecting varieties with a high proportion of RS starch as drying of cooked potatoes leads to unreliable RS measurements. View Full-Text
Keywords: Solanum tuberosum L.; starch; digestibility; freeze-drying; microwave vacuum drying; conductive hydro-drying; instant controlled pressure drop; processing Solanum tuberosum L.; starch; digestibility; freeze-drying; microwave vacuum drying; conductive hydro-drying; instant controlled pressure drop; processing
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Larder, C.E.; Baeghbali, V.; Pilon, C.; Iskandar, M.M.; Donnelly, D.J.; Pacheco, S.; Godbout, S.; Ngadi, M.O.; Kubow, S. Effect of Non-Conventional Drying Methods on In Vitro Starch Digestibility Assessment of Cooked Potato Genotypes. Foods 2019, 8, 382.

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