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Garlic (Allium sativum L.): A Brief Review of Its Antigenotoxic Effects

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Escuela Superior de Medicina, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, “Unidad Casco de Santo Tomas”, Plan de San Luis y Díaz Mirón s/n, Ciudad de México 11340, Mexico
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Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, “Unidad Profesional A. López Mateos”. Av. Wilfrido Massieu. Col., Lindavista, Ciudad de México 07738, Mexico
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Instituto de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Ex-Hacienda de la Concepción, Tilcuautla, Pachuca de Soto 42080, Mexico
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Escuela Superior de Cómputo, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, “Unidad Profesional A. López Mateos”. Av. Juan de Dios Bátiz. Col., Lindavista, Ciudad de México 07738, Mexico
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2019, 8(8), 343; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8080343
Received: 24 June 2019 / Revised: 31 July 2019 / Accepted: 6 August 2019 / Published: 13 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Food Nutrition)
Traditional Medicine/Complementary and Alternative Medicine is a practice that incorporates medicine based on plants, animals, and minerals for diagnosing, treating, and preventing certain diseases, including chronic degenerative diseases such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and cancer. Different factors generate its continued acceptance, highlighting its diversity, easy access, low cost, and the presence of relatively few adverse effects and, importantly, a high possibility of discovering antigenotoxic agents. In this regard, it is known that the use of different antigenotoxic agents is an efficient alternative to preventing human cancer and that, in general, these can act by means of a combination of various mechanisms of action and against one or various mutagens and/or carcinogens. Therefore, it is relevant to confirm its usefulness, efficacy, and its spectrum of action through different assays. With this in mind, the present manuscript has as its objective the compilation of different investigations carried out with garlic that have demonstrated its genoprotective capacity, and that have been evaluated by means of five of the most outstanding tests (Ames test, sister chromatid exchange, chromosomal aberrations, micronucleus, and comet assay). Thus, we intend to provide information and bibliographic support to investigators in order for them to broaden their studies on the antigenotoxic spectrum of action of this perennial plant. View Full-Text
Keywords: garlic; Ames test; sister chromatid exchange; chromosomal aberrations; micronucleus; comet assay; antigenotoxic potential garlic; Ames test; sister chromatid exchange; chromosomal aberrations; micronucleus; comet assay; antigenotoxic potential
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Morales-González, J.A.; Madrigal-Bujaidar, E.; Sánchez-Gutiérrez, M.; Izquierdo-Vega, J.A.; Valadez-Vega, M.C.; Álvarez-González, I.; Morales-González, Á.; Madrigal-Santillán, E. Garlic (Allium sativum L.): A Brief Review of Its Antigenotoxic Effects. Foods 2019, 8, 343.

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