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Open AccessArticle

A Robust DNA Isolation Protocol from Filtered Commercial Olive Oil for PCR-Based Fingerprinting

1
SINAGRI S.r.l.—Spin Off of the University of Bari Aldo Moro, 70126 Bari, Italy
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CREA Research Centre for Cereal and industrial Crops (CREA-CI) S.S. 673, km 25.200, 71122 Foggia, Italy
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Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, via Università 100, 80055 Portici, Napoli, Italy
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Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of Bari Aldo Moro, 70126 Bari, Italy
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Department of Soil, Plant and Food Sciences, University of Bari Aldo Moro, 70126 Bari, Italy
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Luciana Piarulli and Michele Antonio Savoia contributed equally to the article.
Foods 2019, 8(10), 462; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8100462
Received: 29 August 2019 / Revised: 27 September 2019 / Accepted: 6 October 2019 / Published: 9 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Authentication: Techniques, Trends and Emerging Approaches)
Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) has elevated commercial value due to its health appeal, desirable characteristics and quantitatively limited production, and thus it has become an object of intentional adulteration. As EVOOs on the market might consist of a blend of olive varieties or sometimes even of a mixture of oils from different botanical species, an array of DNA-fingerprinting methods have been developed to check the varietal composition of the blend. Starting from a comparison between publicly available DNA extraction protocols, we set up a timely, low-cost, reproducible and effective DNA isolation protocol, which allows an adequate amount of DNA to be recovered even from commercial filtered EVOOs. Then, in order to verify the effectiveness of the DNA extraction protocol herein proposed, we applied PCR-based fingerprinting methods starting from the DNA extracted from three EVOO samples of unknown composition. In particular, genomic regions harboring nine simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and eight genotyping-by-sequencing-derived single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were amplified for authentication and traceability of the three EVOO samples. The whole investigation strategy herein described might favor producers in terms of higher revenues and consumers in terms of price transparency and food safety. View Full-Text
Keywords: DNA extraction protocol; traceability; authentication; genetic tagging; SSRs; SNPs DNA extraction protocol; traceability; authentication; genetic tagging; SSRs; SNPs
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Piarulli, L.; Savoia, M.A.; Taranto, F.; D’Agostino, N.; Sardaro, R.; Girone, S.; Gadaleta, S.; Fucili, V.; De Giovanni, C.; Montemurro, C.; Pasqualone, A.; Fanelli, V. A Robust DNA Isolation Protocol from Filtered Commercial Olive Oil for PCR-Based Fingerprinting. Foods 2019, 8, 462.

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