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Article

Microbial Regulation of Deterioration and Preservation of Salted Kelp under Different Temperature and Salinity Conditions

1
School of Agricultural Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, China
2
School of Food and Biological Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Trond Løvdal and Dagbjørn Skipnes
Foods 2021, 10(8), 1723; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10081723
Received: 13 June 2021 / Revised: 5 July 2021 / Accepted: 6 July 2021 / Published: 26 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Assessment of Food Quality and Safety of Cultivated Macroalgae)
High salinity is an effective measure to preserve kelp, but salted kelp can still deteriorate after long-term preservation. In order to clarify the key conditions and microbial behavior of salted kelp preservation, 10% (S10), 20% (S20), and 30% (S30) salt concentrations were evaluated at 25 °C (T25) and 4 °C (T4). After 30 days storage, these salted kelps showed different states including rot (T25S10), softening (T25S20), and undamaged (other samples). By detecting polysaccharide lyase activity and performing high-throughput sequencing of the prokaryotic 16S rRNA sequence and metagenome, we found that deteriorated kelps (T25S10 and T25S20) had significantly higher alginate lyase activity and bacterial relative abundance than other undamaged samples. Dyella, Saccharophagus, Halomonas, Aromatoleum, Ulvibacter, Rhodopirellula, and Microbulbifer were annotated with genes encoding endonuclease-type alginate lyases, while Bacillus and Thiobacillus were annotated as the exonuclease type. Additionally, no alginate lyase activity was detected in undamaged kelps, whose dominant microorganisms were halophilic archaea without alginate lyase-encoding genes. These results indicated that room-temperature storage may promote salted kelp deterioration due to the secretion of bacterial alginate lyase, while ultra-high-salinity and low-temperature storage can inhibit bacterial alginate lyase and promote the growth of halophilic archaea without alginate lyase, thus achieving the preservation of salted kelp. View Full-Text
Keywords: salted kelp; alginate lyase; halophilic archaea; metagenome salted kelp; alginate lyase; halophilic archaea; metagenome
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wei, W.; Zhang, X.; Hou, Z.; Hu, X.; Wang, Y.; Wang, C.; Yang, S.; Cui, H.; Zhu, L. Microbial Regulation of Deterioration and Preservation of Salted Kelp under Different Temperature and Salinity Conditions. Foods 2021, 10, 1723. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10081723

AMA Style

Wei W, Zhang X, Hou Z, Hu X, Wang Y, Wang C, Yang S, Cui H, Zhu L. Microbial Regulation of Deterioration and Preservation of Salted Kelp under Different Temperature and Salinity Conditions. Foods. 2021; 10(8):1723. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10081723

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wei, Wei, Xin Zhang, Zhaozhi Hou, Xinyu Hu, Yuan Wang, Caizheng Wang, Shujing Yang, Henglin Cui, and Lin Zhu. 2021. "Microbial Regulation of Deterioration and Preservation of Salted Kelp under Different Temperature and Salinity Conditions" Foods 10, no. 8: 1723. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10081723

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