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Review

Glycation of Plant Proteins Via Maillard Reaction: Reaction Chemistry, Technofunctional Properties, and Potential Food Application

1
Department of Food Material Science, Institute of Food Science and Biotechnology, University of Hohenheim, Garbenstrasse 21/25, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany
2
Food and Soft Materials, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 9, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Cristina Delgado-Andrade
Foods 2021, 10(2), 376; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10020376
Received: 29 December 2020 / Revised: 2 February 2021 / Accepted: 5 February 2021 / Published: 9 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Formation of Conjugated Protein via Maillard Reaction)
Plant proteins are being considered to become the most important protein source of the future, and to do so, they must be able to replace the animal-derived proteins currently in use as techno-functional food ingredients. This poses challenges because plant proteins are oftentimes storage proteins with a high molecular weight and low water solubility. One promising approach to overcome these limitations is the glycation of plant proteins. The covalent bonding between the proteins and different carbohydrates created via the initial stage of the Maillard reaction can improve the techno-functional characteristics of these proteins without the involvement of potentially toxic chemicals. However, compared to studies with animal-derived proteins, glycation studies on plant proteins are currently still underrepresented in literature. This review provides an overview of the existing studies on the glycation of the major groups of plant proteins with different carbohydrates using different preparation methods. Emphasis is put on the reaction conditions used for glycation as well as the modifications to physicochemical properties and techno-functionality. Different applications of these glycated plant proteins in emulsions, foams, films, and encapsulation systems are introduced. Another focus lies on the reaction chemistry of the Maillard reaction and ways to harness it for controlled glycation and to limit the formation of undesired advanced glycation products. Finally, challenges related to the controlled glycation of plant proteins to improve their properties are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: Maillard reaction; protein-polysaccharide conjugate; plant proteins; techno-functionality; application; Amadori products; AGEs Maillard reaction; protein-polysaccharide conjugate; plant proteins; techno-functionality; application; Amadori products; AGEs
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kutzli, I.; Weiss, J.; Gibis, M. Glycation of Plant Proteins Via Maillard Reaction: Reaction Chemistry, Technofunctional Properties, and Potential Food Application. Foods 2021, 10, 376. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10020376

AMA Style

Kutzli I, Weiss J, Gibis M. Glycation of Plant Proteins Via Maillard Reaction: Reaction Chemistry, Technofunctional Properties, and Potential Food Application. Foods. 2021; 10(2):376. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10020376

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kutzli, Ines, Jochen Weiss, and Monika Gibis. 2021. "Glycation of Plant Proteins Via Maillard Reaction: Reaction Chemistry, Technofunctional Properties, and Potential Food Application" Foods 10, no. 2: 376. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10020376

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