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Review

Food Texture Design by 3D Printing: A Review

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MARE—Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, Polytechnic of Leiria, Cetemares, 2520-620 Peniche, Portugal
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MARE—Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, School of Tourism and Maritime Technology, Polytechnic of Leiria, Cetemares, 2520-620 Peniche, Portugal
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Pasquale Massimiliano Falcone
Foods 2021, 10(2), 320; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10020320
Received: 9 December 2020 / Revised: 23 January 2021 / Accepted: 29 January 2021 / Published: 3 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Food Engineering and Technology)
An important factor in consumers’ acceptability, beyond visual appearance and taste, is food texture. The elderly and people with dysphagia are more likely to present malnourishment due to visually and texturally unappealing food. Three-dimensional Printing is an additive manufacturing technology that can aid the food industry in developing novel and more complex food products and has the potential to produce tailored foods for specific needs. As a technology that builds food products layer by layer, 3D Printing can present a new methodology to design realistic food textures by the precise placement of texturing elements in the food, printing of multi-material products, and design of complex internal structures. This paper intends to review the existing work on 3D food printing and discuss the recent developments concerning food texture design. Advantages and limitations of 3D Printing in the food industry, the material-based printability and model-based texture, and the future trends in 3D Printing, including numerical simulations, incorporation of cooking technology to the printing, and 4D modifications are discussed. Key challenges for the mainstream adoption of 3D Printing are also elaborated on. View Full-Text
Keywords: food design; texture; 3D printing; personalization; structure; model food design; texture; 3D printing; personalization; structure; model
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pereira, T.; Barroso, S.; Gil, M.M. Food Texture Design by 3D Printing: A Review. Foods 2021, 10, 320. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10020320

AMA Style

Pereira T, Barroso S, Gil MM. Food Texture Design by 3D Printing: A Review. Foods. 2021; 10(2):320. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10020320

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pereira, Tatiana, Sónia Barroso, and Maria M. Gil 2021. "Food Texture Design by 3D Printing: A Review" Foods 10, no. 2: 320. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10020320

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