Next Article in Journal
Recent Development of Microfluidic Technology for Cell Trapping in Single Cell Analysis: A Review
Next Article in Special Issue
Coupled CFD-DEM Simulation of Seed Flow in an Air Seeder Distributor Tube
Previous Article in Journal
Study on Two Types of Stall Patterns in a Centrifugal Compressor with a Wide Vaneless Diffuser
Previous Article in Special Issue
Mixing of Bi-Dispersed Milli-Beads in a Rotary Drum. Mechanical Segregation Analyzed by Lab-Scale Experiments and DEM Simulation
Article

Numerical Characterization of Cohesive and Non-Cohesive ‘Sediments’ under Different Consolidation States Using 3D DEM Triaxial Experiments

1
Dr. Moses Strauss Department of Marine Geosciences, Leon Charney School of Marine Sciences (CSMS), University of Haifa, Haifa 3498838, Israel
2
MARUM–Centre for Marine Environmental Sciences, University of Bremen, Leobener Str. 8, 28359 Bremen, Germany
3
Institute for Geotechnical Engineering, Leibniz University of Hannover, Welfengarten 1a, 30167 Hannover, Germany
4
U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Centre, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Processes 2020, 8(10), 1252; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr8101252
Received: 9 September 2020 / Revised: 1 October 2020 / Accepted: 1 October 2020 / Published: 5 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue DEM Simulations and Modelling of Granular Materials)
The Discrete Element Method has been widely used to simulate geo-materials due to time and scale limitations met in the field and laboratories. While cohesionless geo-materials were the focus of many previous studies, the deformation of cohesive geo-materials in 3D remained poorly characterized. Here, we aimed to generate a range of numerical ‘sediments’, assess their mechanical response to stress and compare their response with laboratory tests, focusing on differences between the micro- and macro-material properties. We simulated two endmembers—clay (cohesive) and sand (cohesionless). The materials were tested in a 3D triaxial numerical setup, under different simulated burial stresses and consolidation states. Variations in particle contact or individual bond strengths generate first order influence on the stress–strain response, i.e., a different deformation style of the numerical sand or clay. Increased burial depth generates a second order influence, elevating peak shear strength. Loose and dense consolidation states generate a third order influence of the endmember level. The results replicate a range of sediment compositions, empirical behaviors and conditions. We propose a procedure to characterize sediments numerically. The numerical ‘sediments’ can be applied to simulate processes in sediments exhibiting variations in strength due to post-seismic consolidation, bioturbation or variations in sedimentation rates. View Full-Text
Keywords: DEM; cohesion; sediments; peak shear strength; consolidation state DEM; cohesion; sediments; peak shear strength; consolidation state
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Elyashiv, H.; Bookman, R.; Siemann, L.; ten Brink, U.; Huhn, K. Numerical Characterization of Cohesive and Non-Cohesive ‘Sediments’ under Different Consolidation States Using 3D DEM Triaxial Experiments. Processes 2020, 8, 1252. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr8101252

AMA Style

Elyashiv H, Bookman R, Siemann L, ten Brink U, Huhn K. Numerical Characterization of Cohesive and Non-Cohesive ‘Sediments’ under Different Consolidation States Using 3D DEM Triaxial Experiments. Processes. 2020; 8(10):1252. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr8101252

Chicago/Turabian Style

Elyashiv, Hadar, Revital Bookman, Lennart Siemann, Uri ten Brink, and Katrin Huhn. 2020. "Numerical Characterization of Cohesive and Non-Cohesive ‘Sediments’ under Different Consolidation States Using 3D DEM Triaxial Experiments" Processes 8, no. 10: 1252. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr8101252

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop