Next Article in Journal
Analysis of Grape Production in the Face of Climate Change
Next Article in Special Issue
The Effect of Increasing Surface Albedo on Urban Climate and Air Quality: A Detailed Study for Sacramento, Houston, and Chicago
Previous Article in Journal
Different Behaviours of the Ross and Weddell Seas Surface Heat Fluxes in the Period 1972–2015
Previous Article in Special Issue
Recognition of Thermal Hot and Cold Spots in Urban Areas in Support of Mitigation Plans to Counteract Overheating: Application for Athens
Article Menu
Issue 1 (March) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Climate 2018, 6(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli6010018

Assessment and Mitigation Strategies to Counteract Overheating in Urban Historical Areas in Rome

Department of Planning, Design and Technology of Architecture, La Sapienza University, Via Flaminia 72, 00196 Rome, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 24 January 2018 / Revised: 12 March 2018 / Accepted: 14 March 2018 / Published: 18 March 2018
Full-Text   |   PDF [7774 KB, uploaded 3 May 2018]   |  

Abstract

As urban overheating is increasing, there is a strong public interest towards mitigation strategies to enhance comfortable urban spaces, for their role in supporting urban metabolism and social life. The study presents an assessment of the existing thermal comfort and usage of San Silvestro Square in Rome during the summer, and performs the simulation of cooling strategies scenarios, to understand their mitigation potential for renovation projects. The first stage concerns a field analysis of the thermal and radiative environment on the 1st and 2nd of August 2014, including meteorological measurements and unobtrusive observations, to understand how people experience and respond to extreme microclimate conditions. In the second stage, the research proposes scenario simulations on the same day to examine the influence of cool colored materials, trees and vegetative surfaces on thermal comfort. The thermal comfort assessment was based on Physiologically Equivalent Temperature (PET), whereas microclimatic simulations were conducted with CFD calculations (ENVImet v.4.3.1). The first stage shows a strong relationship between lower PET values and attendance rate, depending on daily shading patterns. The second stage shows a relevant improvement of thermal comfort, with PET values of −12 °C comparing to the no-intervention scenario, associated with a combination of cool materials and trees. View Full-Text
Keywords: overheating; summer heat stress; urban open space; shading; thermal comfort; Physiologically Equivalent Temperature; mitigation strategies; cooling technologies; cool materials overheating; summer heat stress; urban open space; shading; thermal comfort; Physiologically Equivalent Temperature; mitigation strategies; cooling technologies; cool materials
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Laureti, F.; Martinelli, L.; Battisti, A. Assessment and Mitigation Strategies to Counteract Overheating in Urban Historical Areas in Rome. Climate 2018, 6, 18.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Climate EISSN 2225-1154 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top