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Article

Comparative Metabolomics Profiling of Polyphenols, Nutrients and Antioxidant Activities of Two Red Onion (Allium cepa L.) Cultivars

1
Vegetable & Fruit Improvement Center, Department of Horticultural Sciences, Texas A&M University, 1500 Research Parkway, Suite A120, College Station, TX 77845-2119, USA
2
National Center of Excellence for Melon at the Vegetable and Fruit Improvement Center of Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77845, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2020, 9(9), 1077; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9091077
Received: 1 August 2020 / Revised: 14 August 2020 / Accepted: 19 August 2020 / Published: 21 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mechanisms of Plant Antioxidants Action)
Onion is among the most widely cultivated and consumed economic crops. Onions are an excellent dietary source of polyphenols and nutrients. However, onions phytonutrient compositions vary with cultivars and growing locations. Therefore, the present study involved the evaluation of polyphenol, nutritional composition (proteins, nitrogen, and minerals), sugars, pyruvate, antioxidant, and α-amylase inhibition activities of red onion cultivars, sweet Italian, and honeysuckle grown in California and Texas, respectively. The total flavonoid for honeysuckle and sweet Italian was 449 and 345 μg/g FW, respectively. The total anthocyanin for honeysuckle onion was 103 μg/g FW, while for sweet Italian onion was 86 μg/g FW. Cyanidin-3-(6”-malonoylglucoside) and cyanidin-3-(6”-malonoyl-laminaribioside) were the major components in both the cultivars. The pungency of red onions in honeysuckle ranged between 4.9 and 7.9 μmoL/mL, whereas in sweet Italian onion ranged from 8.3 to 10 μmoL/mL. The principal component analysis was applied to determine the most important variables that separate the cultivars of red onion. Overall results indicated that total flavonoids, total phenolic content, total anthocyanins, protein, and calories for honeysuckle onions were higher than the sweet Italian onions. These results could provide information about high quality and adding value to functional food due to the phytochemicals and nutritional composition of red onions. View Full-Text
Keywords: Allium cepa L.; honeysuckle; sweet Italian; flavonoids; anthocyanins Allium cepa L.; honeysuckle; sweet Italian; flavonoids; anthocyanins
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MDPI and ACS Style

Metrani, R.; Singh, J.; Acharya, P.; K. Jayaprakasha, G.; S. Patil, B. Comparative Metabolomics Profiling of Polyphenols, Nutrients and Antioxidant Activities of Two Red Onion (Allium cepa L.) Cultivars. Plants 2020, 9, 1077. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9091077

AMA Style

Metrani R, Singh J, Acharya P, K. Jayaprakasha G, S. Patil B. Comparative Metabolomics Profiling of Polyphenols, Nutrients and Antioxidant Activities of Two Red Onion (Allium cepa L.) Cultivars. Plants. 2020; 9(9):1077. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9091077

Chicago/Turabian Style

Metrani, Rita, Jashbir Singh, Pratibha Acharya, Guddadarangavvanahally K. Jayaprakasha, and Bhimanagouda S. Patil. 2020. "Comparative Metabolomics Profiling of Polyphenols, Nutrients and Antioxidant Activities of Two Red Onion (Allium cepa L.) Cultivars" Plants 9, no. 9: 1077. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9091077

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