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A Review of Plant Vacuoles: Formation, Located Proteins, and Functions

Institute of Life Sciences, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, China
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Plants 2019, 8(9), 327; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8090327
Received: 19 July 2019 / Revised: 22 August 2019 / Accepted: 4 September 2019 / Published: 5 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Plant Physiology and Metabolism)
Vacuoles, cellular membrane-bound organelles, are the largest compartments of cells, occupying up to 90% of the volume of plant cells. Vacuoles are formed by the biosynthetic and endocytotic pathways. In plants, the vacuole is crucial for growth and development and has a variety of functions, including storage and transport, intracellular environmental stability, and response to injury. Depending on the cell type and growth conditions, the size of vacuoles is highly dynamic. Different types of cell vacuoles store different substances, such as alkaloids, protein enzymes, inorganic salts, sugars, etc., and play important roles in multiple signaling pathways. Here, we summarize vacuole formation, types, vacuole-located proteins, and functions. View Full-Text
Keywords: plant vacuole; lytic vacuole; protein storage vacuole; vacuole iron transporter plant vacuole; lytic vacuole; protein storage vacuole; vacuole iron transporter
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Tan, X.; Li, K.; Wang, Z.; Zhu, K.; Tan, X.; Cao, J. A Review of Plant Vacuoles: Formation, Located Proteins, and Functions. Plants 2019, 8, 327.

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