Next Article in Journal
Experiment in Finding Look-Alike European Cities Using Urban Atlas Data
Next Article in Special Issue
A Gamification-Based Approach on Indoor Wayfinding Research
Previous Article in Journal
GroupSeeker: An Applicable Framework for Travel Companion Discovery from Vast Trajectory Data
Previous Article in Special Issue
Participation, for Whom? The Potential of Gamified Participatory Artefacts in Uncovering Power Relations within Urban Renewal Projects
Open AccessArticle

Supporting Disaster Resilience Spatial Thinking with Serious GeoGames: Project Lily Pad

1
Center for Geographic Information Science and Technology, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623, USA
2
School of Interactive Games & Media, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Casey Lane works in Gemini Engineering now; Scott Williams works in SUNY Geneseo now; Deborah Orieta works in Syracuse University now; Matthew Plummer works in Esri now; Anushka Nair works in Vicarious Visions now; Kyle Pecsok works in Clark University now; Emma Thomley works in Senator Amy Klobuchar Office now; Erin Mahoney works in Senator Charles E. Schumer Office now.
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9(6), 405; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi9060405
Received: 8 May 2020 / Revised: 8 June 2020 / Accepted: 14 June 2020 / Published: 22 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gaming and Geospatial Information)
The need for improvement of societal disaster resilience and response efforts was evident after the destruction caused by the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season. We present a novel conceptual framework for improving disaster resilience through the combination of serious games, geographic information systems (GIS), spatial thinking, and disaster resilience. Our framework is implemented via Project Lily Pad, a serious geogame based on our conceptual framework, serious game case studies, interviews and real-life experiences from 2017 Hurricane Harvey survivors in Dickinson, TX, and an immersive hurricane-induced flooding scenario. The game teaches a four-fold set of skills relevant to spatial thinking and disaster resilience, including reading a map, navigating an environment, coding verbal instructions, and determining best practices in a disaster situation. Results of evaluation of the four skills via Project Lily Pad through a “think aloud” study conducted by both emergency management novices and professionals revealed that the game encouraged players to think spatially, can help build awareness for disaster response scenarios, and has potential for real-life use by emergency management professionals. It can be concluded from our results that the combination of serious games, geographic information systems (GIS), spatial thinking, and disaster resilience, as implemented via Project Lily Pad and our evaluation results, demonstrated the wide range of possibilities for using serious geogames to improve disaster resilience spatial thinking and potentially save lives when disasters occur. View Full-Text
Keywords: serious games; geographic information technologies; urban games; spatial thinking; disaster resilience; geographic information systems (GIS); Hurricane Harvey; CityEngine; geospatial data serious games; geographic information technologies; urban games; spatial thinking; disaster resilience; geographic information systems (GIS); Hurricane Harvey; CityEngine; geospatial data
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Tomaszewski, B.; Walker, A.; Gawlik, E.; Lane, C.; Williams, S.; Orieta, D.; McDaniel, C.; Plummer, M.; Nair, A.; San Jose, N.; Terrell, N.; Pecsok, K.; Thomley, E.; Mahoney, E.; Haberlack, E.; Schwartz, D. Supporting Disaster Resilience Spatial Thinking with Serious GeoGames: Project Lily Pad. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9, 405.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop