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Article

Development after Displacement: Evaluating the Utility of OpenStreetMap Data for Monitoring Sustainable Development Goal Progress in Refugee Settlements

1
College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
2
Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction, and Institute for Global Health, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: A. Yair Grinberger, Marco Minghini, Peter Mooney, Levente Juhász, Godwin Yeboah and Wolfgang Kainz
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10(3), 153; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi10030153
Received: 3 January 2021 / Revised: 18 February 2021 / Accepted: 6 March 2021 / Published: 10 March 2021
In 2015, 193 countries declared their commitment to “leave no one behind” in pursuit of 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). However, the world’s refugees have been routinely excluded from national censuses and representative surveys, and, as a result, have broadly been overlooked in SDG evaluations. In this study, we examine the potential of OpenStreetMap (OSM) data for monitoring SDG progress in refugee settlements. We collected all available OSM data in 28 refugee and 26 nearby non-refugee settlements in the major refugee-hosting country of Uganda. We created a novel SDG-OSM data model, measured the spatial and temporal coverages of SDG-relevant OSM data across refugee settlements, and compared these results to non-refugee settlements. We found 11 different SDGs represented across 92% (21,950) of OSM data in refugee settlements, compared to 78% (1919 nodes) in non-refugee settlements. However, most data were created three years after refugee arrival, and 81% of OSM data in refugee settlements were never edited, both of which limit the potential for long-term monitoring of SDG progress. In light of our findings, we offer suggestions for improving OSM-driven SDG monitoring in refugee settlements that have relevance for development and humanitarian practitioners and research communities alike. View Full-Text
Keywords: OSM; UNHCR; Uganda; SDGs; humanitarian OSM; UNHCR; Uganda; SDGs; humanitarian
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MDPI and ACS Style

Van Den Hoek, J.; Friedrich, H.K.; Ballasiotes, A.; Peters, L.E.R.; Wrathall, D. Development after Displacement: Evaluating the Utility of OpenStreetMap Data for Monitoring Sustainable Development Goal Progress in Refugee Settlements. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10, 153. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi10030153

AMA Style

Van Den Hoek J, Friedrich HK, Ballasiotes A, Peters LER, Wrathall D. Development after Displacement: Evaluating the Utility of OpenStreetMap Data for Monitoring Sustainable Development Goal Progress in Refugee Settlements. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information. 2021; 10(3):153. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi10030153

Chicago/Turabian Style

Van Den Hoek, Jamon, Hannah K. Friedrich, Anna Ballasiotes, Laura E.R. Peters, and David Wrathall. 2021. "Development after Displacement: Evaluating the Utility of OpenStreetMap Data for Monitoring Sustainable Development Goal Progress in Refugee Settlements" ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information 10, no. 3: 153. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi10030153

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