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Open AccessReview

Prosopis Plant Chemical Composition and Pharmacological Attributes: Targeting Clinical Studies from Preclinical Evidence

1
Phytochemistry Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 1991953381, Iran
2
Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 11369, Iran
3
Department of Chemistry, Richardson College for the Environmental Science Complex, The University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg MB R3B 2G3, Canada
4
Department of Pharmacognosy and Biotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 11369, Iran
5
EvidenceBased Phytotherapy & Complementary Medicine Research Center, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj 19839-63113, Iran
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Department of Pharmacognosy, School of Pharmacy, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj 19839-63113, Iran
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G. B. Pant National Institute of Himalayan Environment and Sustainable Development, Garhwal Regional Centre, Upper Baktiyana, Srinagar-246 174, Uttarakhand, India
8
Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Food Engineering Department, Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University, Halkali, 34303 Istanbul, Turkey
9
Faculty of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, Food Engineering Department, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak, 34469 Istanbul, Turkey
10
Department of Food Science, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8520, USA
11
University of Belgrade, Faculty of Agriculture, Chair of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 11080 Belgrade, Serbia
12
Mevsim Gida Sanayi ve Soguk Depo Ticaret A.S. (MVSM Foods), Turankoy, Kestel, 16450 Bursa, Turkey
13
Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Avicenna Tajik State Medical University, Rudaki 139, Dushanbe 734003, Tajikistan
14
H.E.J. Research Institute of Chemistry, International Center for Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Karachi, Karachi 75270, Pakistan
15
Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Alameda Prof. Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319 Porto, Portugal
16
Institute for Research and Innovation in Health (i3S), University of Porto, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Biomolecules 2019, 9(12), 777; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom9120777
Received: 3 October 2019 / Revised: 11 November 2019 / Accepted: 17 November 2019 / Published: 25 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2019 Feature Papers by Biomolecules’ Editorial Board Members)
Members of the Prosopis genus are native to America, Africa and Asia, and have long been used in traditional medicine. The Prosopis species most commonly used for medicinal purposes are P. africana, P. alba, P. cineraria, P. farcta, P. glandulosa, P. juliflora, P. nigra, P. ruscifolia and P. spicigera, which are highly effective in asthma, birth/postpartum pains, callouses, conjunctivitis, diabetes, diarrhea, expectorant, fever, flu, lactation, liver infection, malaria, otitis, pains, pediculosis, rheumatism, scabies, skin inflammations, spasm, stomach ache, bladder and pancreas stone removal. Flour, syrup, and beverages from Prosopis pods have also been potentially used for foods and food supplement formulation in many regions of the world. In addition, various in vitro and in vivo studies have revealed interesting antiplasmodial, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anticancer, antidiabetic and wound healing effects. The phytochemical composition of Prosopis plants, namely their content of C-glycosyl flavones (such as schaftoside, isoschaftoside, vicenin II, vitexin and isovitexin) has been increasingly correlated with the observed biological effects. Thus, given the literature reports, Prosopis plants have positive impact on the human diet and general health. In this sense, the present review provides an in-depth overview of the literature data regarding Prosopis plants’ chemical composition, pharmacological and food applications, covering from pre-clinical data to upcoming clinical studies.
Keywords: Prosopis; vitexin; C-glycosyl flavones; food preservative; antiplasmodial; wound healing potential Prosopis; vitexin; C-glycosyl flavones; food preservative; antiplasmodial; wound healing potential
MDPI and ACS Style

Sharifi-Rad, J.; Kobarfard, F.; Ata, A.; Ayatollahi, S.A.; Khosravi-Dehaghi, N.; Jugran, A.K.; Tomas, M.; Capanoglu, E.; Matthews, K.R.; Popović-Djordjević, J.; Kostić, A.; Kamiloglu, S.; Sharopov, F.; Choudhary, M.I.; Martins, N. Prosopis Plant Chemical Composition and Pharmacological Attributes: Targeting Clinical Studies from Preclinical Evidence. Biomolecules 2019, 9, 777.

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