Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Associations between Blood Metabolic Profile at 7 Years Old and Eating Disorders in Adolescence: Findings from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children
Previous Article in Journal
Comprehensive Evaluation of Parameters Affecting One-Step Method for Quantitative Analysis of Fatty Acids in Meat
Previous Article in Special Issue
Multiplatform Urinary Metabolomics Profiling to Discriminate Cachectic from Non-Cachectic Colorectal Cancer Patients: Pilot Results from the ColoCare Study
Open AccessArticle

Differences in Pregnancy Metabolic Profiles and Their Determinants between White European and South Asian Women: Findings from the Born in Bradford Cohort

1
Population Health Science, Bristol Medical School, Bristol BS8 2BN, UK
2
MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 2PS, UK
3
Bradford Institute for Health Research, Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford BD9 6RJ, UK
4
Translational Science, Bristol Medical School, Bristol BS2 8DZ, UK
5
Bristol NIHR Biomedical Research Center, Bristol BS1 2NT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Metabolites 2019, 9(9), 190; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9090190
Received: 21 May 2019 / Revised: 16 September 2019 / Accepted: 17 September 2019 / Published: 18 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics in Epidemiological Studies)
There is widespread metabolic disruption in women upon becoming pregnant. South Asians (SA) compared to White Europeans (WE) have more fat mass and are more insulin-resistant at a given body mass index (BMI). Whether these are reflected in other gestational metabolomic differences is unclear. Our aim was to compare gestational metabolic profiles and their determinants between WE and SA women. We used data from a United Kingdom (UK) cohort to compare metabolic profiles and associations of maternal age, education, parity, height, BMI, tricep skinfold thickness, gestational diabetes (GD), pre-eclampsia, and gestational hypertension with 156 metabolic measurements in WE (n = 4072) and SA (n = 4702) women. Metabolic profiles, measured in fasting serum taken between 26–28 weeks gestation, were quantified by nuclear magnetic resonance. Distributions of most metabolic measures differed by ethnicity. WE women had higher levels of most lipoprotein subclasses, cholesterol, glycerides and phospholipids, monosaturated fatty acids, and creatinine but lower levels of glucose, linoleic acid, omega-6 and polyunsaturated fatty acids, and most amino acids. Higher BMI and having GD were associated with higher levels of several lipoprotein subclasses, triglycerides, and other metabolites, mostly with stronger associations in WEs. We have shown differences in gestational metabolic profiles between WE and SA women and demonstrated that associations of exposures with these metabolites differ by ethnicity. View Full-Text
Keywords: pregnancy; ethnicity; serum; metabolomics; cardiometabolic profile; birth cohort; Born in Bradford pregnancy; ethnicity; serum; metabolomics; cardiometabolic profile; birth cohort; Born in Bradford
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Taylor, K.; L. Santos Ferreira, D.; West, J.; Yang, T.; Caputo, M.; A. Lawlor, D. Differences in Pregnancy Metabolic Profiles and Their Determinants between White European and South Asian Women: Findings from the Born in Bradford Cohort. Metabolites 2019, 9, 190.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop