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Rapid Cerebral Metabolic Shift during Neonatal Sepsis Is Attenuated by Enteral Colostrum Supplementation in Preterm Pigs

1
Department of Food Science, Aarhus University, Kirstinebjergvej 10, 5792 Aarslev, Denmark
2
Comparative Pediatrics and Nutrition, Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 1870 Frederiksberg, Denmark
3
School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, 510220 Guangzhou, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Metabolites 2019, 9(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9010013
Received: 3 December 2018 / Revised: 4 January 2019 / Accepted: 7 January 2019 / Published: 11 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NMR-based Metabolomics and Its Applications Volume 2)
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Abstract

Sepsis, the clinical manifestation of serious infection, may disturb normal brain development, especially in preterm infants with an immature brain. We hypothesized that neonatal sepsis induces systemic metabolic alterations that rapidly affect metabolic signatures in immature brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Cesarean-delivered preterm pigs systemically received 109 CFU/kg Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) and were provided total parenteral nutrition (n = 9) or enteral supplementation with bovine colostrum (n = 10) and compared with uninfected pigs receiving parenteral nutrition (n = 7). Plasma, CSF, and brain tissue samples were collected after 24 h and analyzed by 1H NMR-based metabolomics. Both plasma and CSF metabolomes revealed SE-induced changes in metabolite levels that reflected a modified energy metabolism. Hence, increased plasma lactate, alanine, and succinate levels, as well as CSF lactate levels, were observed during SE infection (all p < 0.05, ANOVA analysis). Myo-inositol, a glucose derivative known for beneficial effects on lung maturation in preterm infants, was also increased in plasma and CSF following SE infection. Enteral colostrum supplementation attenuated the lactate accumulation in blood and CSF. Bloodstream infection in preterm newborns was found to induce a rapid metabolic shift in both plasma and CSF, which was modulated by colostrum feeding. View Full-Text
Keywords: NMR metabolomics; neonatal sepsis; preterm infants; bloodstream infection; cerebrospinal fluid; Staphylococcus epidermidis; brain metabolites; cerebral metabolism; enteral feeding; bioactive dairy components NMR metabolomics; neonatal sepsis; preterm infants; bloodstream infection; cerebrospinal fluid; Staphylococcus epidermidis; brain metabolites; cerebral metabolism; enteral feeding; bioactive dairy components
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Alinaghi, M.; Jiang, P.-P.; Brunse, A.; Sangild, P.T.; Bertram, H.C. Rapid Cerebral Metabolic Shift during Neonatal Sepsis Is Attenuated by Enteral Colostrum Supplementation in Preterm Pigs. Metabolites 2019, 9, 13.

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