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Article

Use of Different Metal Oxide Coatings in Stainless Steel Based ECDs for Smart Textiles

1
Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Maribor, Smetanova 17, SI-2000 Maribor, Slovenia
2
FunGlass—Centre for Functional and Surface Functionalized Glass, Alexander Dubček University of Trenčín, Študentská 2, SK-91150 Trenčín, Slovakia
3
Faculty of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Information Technologies, University of Primorska, Glagoljaška 8, SI-6000 Koper, Slovenia
4
Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Večna Pot 113, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Kris Campbell
Electronics 2021, 10(20), 2529; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics10202529
Received: 29 September 2021 / Revised: 12 October 2021 / Accepted: 15 October 2021 / Published: 17 October 2021
Electrochromism is the ability of a material to selectively change its coloration under the influence of an external electric current/potential and maintain it even after the power source has been disconnected. Devices that use such a mechanism are known as electrochromic devices (ECDs). Over the years, significant effort has been invested into the development of flexible ECDs. Such electrochromic tapes or fibers can be used as smart textiles. Recently, we utilized a novel geometrical approach in assembling electrochromic tapes which does not require the use of optically transparent electrodes. The so-called inverted sandwich ECD configuration can employ various color-changing mechanisms, e.g., intercalation, redox reactions of electrolytes or reactions on electrode surfaces. One of the most frequently used electrochromic metal oxides is WO3. However, other metal oxides with different coloration responses also exist. In this paper, we explore the use of V2O5 and TiO2 in metal-tape-based ECDs in the inverted sandwich configuration and compare their performance with WO3-based devices. Morphological features of metal oxide thin layers were investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the performance of the tapes was investigated electrochemically and spectroscopically. We demonstrate that well-established preparation techniques (e.g., sol–gel synthesis) along with coating approaches (e.g., dipping) are adequate to prepare optically nontransparent fiber electrodes. Depending on the metal oxide, flexible electrochromic fiber devices exhibiting different coloration patterns can be assembled. Devices with TiO2 showed little coloration response, while much better performance was achieved in the case of V2O5 and WO3 ECDs. View Full-Text
Keywords: electrochromism; thin film; metal oxide; intercalation; inverted sandwich; stainless steel electrochromism; thin film; metal oxide; intercalation; inverted sandwich; stainless steel
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rozman, M.; Cetin, N.; Bren, U.; Lukšič, M. Use of Different Metal Oxide Coatings in Stainless Steel Based ECDs for Smart Textiles. Electronics 2021, 10, 2529. https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics10202529

AMA Style

Rozman M, Cetin N, Bren U, Lukšič M. Use of Different Metal Oxide Coatings in Stainless Steel Based ECDs for Smart Textiles. Electronics. 2021; 10(20):2529. https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics10202529

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rozman, Martin, Nikolina Cetin, Urban Bren, and Miha Lukšič. 2021. "Use of Different Metal Oxide Coatings in Stainless Steel Based ECDs for Smart Textiles" Electronics 10, no. 20: 2529. https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics10202529

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