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Communication

Citrate-Coated Platinum Nanoparticles Exhibit a Primary Particle-Size Dependent Effect on Stimulating Melanogenesis in Human Melanocytes

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5281, USA
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8434, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cosmetics 2020, 7(4), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics7040088
Received: 7 October 2020 / Revised: 4 November 2020 / Accepted: 5 November 2020 / Published: 9 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Cosmetics in 2020)
Hypopigmentation disorders due to an underproduction of the pigment melanin by melanocytes cause uneven skin coloration, while in hair follicles they cause grey hair. There is a need for novel materials which can stimulate melanogenesis in the skin and hair for personal care use. While titanium dioxide, gold and silver nanoparticles have been extensively used for applications in cosmetic and personal-care products (PCP), the use of relatively inert platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) has remained underappreciated. PtNPs have been reported to be a mimetic of the enzyme catechol oxidase with small size PtNPs reported to exhibit a higher catechol oxidase activity in a cell-free system, but no testing has been conducted in melanocytes to date. Herein, we have investigated if PtNPs of two sizes (SPtNP: 5 nm; LPtNP: 50 nm) might have an effect on melanogenesis. To this end, we have used MNT-1 human melanoma cells and primary human melanocytes from moderately-pigmented skin (HEMn-MP). Both SPtNP and LPtNP were nontoxic over a concentration range 6.25–25 μg/mL, hence these concentrations were used in further experiments. Both PtNPs stimulated higher extracellular melanin levels than control; SPtNP at concentrations 12.5 and 25 μg/mL significantly stimulated higher levels of extracellular melanin as compared to similar concentrations of LPtNP in MNT-1 cells, in the absence of ROS generation. The effects of PtNPs on melanin secretion were reversible upon removal of PtNPs from the culture medium. The results of primary particle size-specific augmentation of extracellular melanin by SPtNPs were also validated in HEMn-MP cells. Our results thus provide a proof-of-principle that SPtNP might hold potential as a candidate for the treatment of white skin patches, for sunless skin-tanning and for use in anti-greying hair products in cosmetics. View Full-Text
Keywords: platinum nanoparticles; particle size; MNT-1 human melanoma cells; primary human melanocytes from moderately-pigmented skin; extracellular melanin; pro-pigmentation platinum nanoparticles; particle size; MNT-1 human melanoma cells; primary human melanocytes from moderately-pigmented skin; extracellular melanin; pro-pigmentation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Goenka, S.; Toussaint, J. Citrate-Coated Platinum Nanoparticles Exhibit a Primary Particle-Size Dependent Effect on Stimulating Melanogenesis in Human Melanocytes. Cosmetics 2020, 7, 88. https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics7040088

AMA Style

Goenka S, Toussaint J. Citrate-Coated Platinum Nanoparticles Exhibit a Primary Particle-Size Dependent Effect on Stimulating Melanogenesis in Human Melanocytes. Cosmetics. 2020; 7(4):88. https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics7040088

Chicago/Turabian Style

Goenka, Shilpi, and Jimmy Toussaint. 2020. "Citrate-Coated Platinum Nanoparticles Exhibit a Primary Particle-Size Dependent Effect on Stimulating Melanogenesis in Human Melanocytes" Cosmetics 7, no. 4: 88. https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics7040088

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