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Comment published on 26 May 2021, see Coatings 2021, 11(6), 636.
Article

Suitability of a Progenitor Cell-Enriching Device for In Vitro Applications

1
Melbourne Dental School, The University of Melbourne, 720 Swanston Street, Carton, VIC 3053, Australia
2
Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, Via Salvador Allende, 43, 84081 Baronissi, Salerno, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Ajay Vikram Singh and Eduardo Guzmán
Coatings 2021, 11(2), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11020146
Received: 30 December 2020 / Revised: 21 January 2021 / Accepted: 25 January 2021 / Published: 28 January 2021
Rigenera® is a novel class-1 medical device that produces micro-grafts enriched of progenitors cells without ex vivo manipulation of donor tissues. The manufacturer’s protocol has been supported for a wide variety of clinical uses in the field of regenerative medicine. This study aimed to evaluate its potential use for in vitro cell models. Human primary oral fibroblasts were cultured under standard conditions and processed through Rigenera® over a time course of up to 5 min. Cell viability was assessed using a Trypan Blue exclusion test. It is possible to process fibroblasts through Rigenera® although an initial reduction of cell viability was observed. Additionally, debris was evident in the cell suspension of the processed samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) microanalysis of the debris and electron energy-loss spectroscopy confirmed the presence of metal wear possibly due to the processing conditions used in this study. Interestingly, pore sizes within Rigeneracons® grids were found to range between 250–400 μm. This is the first report assessing the suitability of Rigenera® and Rigeneracons® for in vitro applications. Whilst Rigenera® workflow was found to be amenable to laboratory uses, our results strongly suggest that further research and development is necessary to support the utilization of this technology for enrichment of micro-graft derived cells and cell sorting in vitro. View Full-Text
Keywords: Rigenera®; stem cells; progenitor cells; multipotent; cell sorting; regeneration Rigenera®; stem cells; progenitor cells; multipotent; cell sorting; regeneration
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MDPI and ACS Style

Celentano, A.; Yap, T.; Pantaleo, G.; Paolini, R.; McCullough, M.; Cirillo, N. Suitability of a Progenitor Cell-Enriching Device for In Vitro Applications. Coatings 2021, 11, 146. https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11020146

AMA Style

Celentano A, Yap T, Pantaleo G, Paolini R, McCullough M, Cirillo N. Suitability of a Progenitor Cell-Enriching Device for In Vitro Applications. Coatings. 2021; 11(2):146. https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11020146

Chicago/Turabian Style

Celentano, Antonio, Tami Yap, Giuseppe Pantaleo, Rita Paolini, Michael McCullough, and Nicola Cirillo. 2021. "Suitability of a Progenitor Cell-Enriching Device for In Vitro Applications" Coatings 11, no. 2: 146. https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11020146

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