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Comparison of Exterior Coatings Applied to Oak Wood as a Function of Natural and Artificial Weathering Exposure
Open AccessArticle

Wettability of Wood Surface Layer Examined From Chemical Change Perspective

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Institute of Wood Based Products and Technologies, University of Sopron, Bajcsy-Zs. E. 4, 9400 Sopron, Hungary
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Institute of Chemistry, University of Sopron, Bajcsy-Zs. E. 4, 9400 Sopron, Hungary
3
Institute of Cellulose and Paper Technology, celltech-paper Ltd., 9400 Sopron, Hungary
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Coatings 2020, 10(3), 257; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10030257
Received: 17 February 2020 / Revised: 6 March 2020 / Accepted: 8 March 2020 / Published: 10 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Surface Modification and Treatment of Wood)
The effect of artificial ageing on spruce (Picea abies), beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), birch (Betula pendula), and sessile oak (Quercus petraea) wood surfaces were investigated using qualitative (total phenolic and total soluble carbohydrate content) chemical examination methods. During ageing (∑240h), the influence of surface chemistry modifications was monitored by contact angle measurements of polar, dispersive (distilled water), and dispersive (diiodomethane) liquids. The results clearly show the relation between the ratio of main chemical components of the wood surface layer and surface wettability during artificial radiation. The identified surface chemistry modifications cause more significant change in the contact angle of polar and dispersive liquid, relative to the change of dispersive liquid contact angle. Chemical changes of the wood surface layer are due to the degradation of the main wood components (cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin) which can be properly monitored by total phenolic (TPC) and total soluble carbohydrate content (TSCC) measurements. View Full-Text
Keywords: wettability; phenol; carbohydrates; beech; birch; spruce; sessile oak wettability; phenol; carbohydrates; beech; birch; spruce; sessile oak
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MDPI and ACS Style

Papp, E.A.; Csiha, C.; Makk, A.N.; Hofmann, T.; Csoka, L. Wettability of Wood Surface Layer Examined From Chemical Change Perspective. Coatings 2020, 10, 257.

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