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Article

Bismuth Nanoantibiotics Display Anticandidal Activity and Disrupt the Biofilm and Cell Morphology of the Emergent Pathogenic Yeast Candida auris

1
Department of Biology, and South Texas Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases, The University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249, USA
2
School of Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antibiotics 2020, 9(8), 461; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9080461
Received: 19 June 2020 / Revised: 27 July 2020 / Accepted: 28 July 2020 / Published: 29 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungal Pathogens: Resistance and Novel Therapeutics)
Candida auris is an emergent multidrug-resistant pathogenic yeast, which forms biofilms resistant to antifungals, sanitizing procedures, and harsh environmental conditions. Antimicrobial nanomaterials represent an alternative to reduce the spread of pathogens—including yeasts—regardless of their drug-resistant profile. Here we have assessed the antimicrobial activity of easy-to-synthesize bismuth nanoparticles (BiNPs) against the emergent multidrug-resistant yeast Candida auris, under both planktonic and biofilm growing conditions. Additionally, we have examined the effect of these BiNPs on cell morphology and biofilm structure. Under planktonic conditions, BiNPs MIC values ranged from 1 to 4 µg mL−1 against multiple C. auris strains tested, including representatives of all different clades. Regarding the inhibition of biofilm formation, the calculated BiNPs IC50 values ranged from 5.1 to 113.1 µg mL−1. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations indicated that BiNPs disrupted the C. auris cell morphology and the structure of the biofilms. In conclusion, BiNPs displayed strong antifungal activity against all strains of C. auris under planktonic conditions, but moderate activity against biofilm growth. BiNPs may potentially contribute to reducing the spread of C. auris strains at healthcare facilities, as sanitizers and future potential treatments. More research on the antimicrobial activity of BiNPs is warranted. View Full-Text
Keywords: nanoantibiotics; Candida auris; biofilms; pathogenic fungi; bismuth nanoparticles; novel agents; multidrug-resistance; SEM analysis; biofilm structure nanoantibiotics; Candida auris; biofilms; pathogenic fungi; bismuth nanoparticles; novel agents; multidrug-resistance; SEM analysis; biofilm structure
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MDPI and ACS Style

Vazquez-Munoz, R.; Lopez, F.D.; Lopez-Ribot, J.L. Bismuth Nanoantibiotics Display Anticandidal Activity and Disrupt the Biofilm and Cell Morphology of the Emergent Pathogenic Yeast Candida auris. Antibiotics 2020, 9, 461. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9080461

AMA Style

Vazquez-Munoz R, Lopez FD, Lopez-Ribot JL. Bismuth Nanoantibiotics Display Anticandidal Activity and Disrupt the Biofilm and Cell Morphology of the Emergent Pathogenic Yeast Candida auris. Antibiotics. 2020; 9(8):461. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9080461

Chicago/Turabian Style

Vazquez-Munoz, Roberto, Fernando D. Lopez, and Jose L. Lopez-Ribot. 2020. "Bismuth Nanoantibiotics Display Anticandidal Activity and Disrupt the Biofilm and Cell Morphology of the Emergent Pathogenic Yeast Candida auris" Antibiotics 9, no. 8: 461. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9080461

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