Next Article in Journal
Computational Design of Inhibitors Targeting the Catalytic β Subunit of Escherichia coli FOF1-ATP Synthase
Next Article in Special Issue
Transmission of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus spp. from Infected Dogs to the Home Environment and Owners
Previous Article in Journal
Bacteriophage Tail Proteins as a Tool for Bacterial Pathogen Recognition—A Literature Review
Previous Article in Special Issue
Concentrations of Ciprofloxacin in the World’s Rivers Are Associated with the Prevalence of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Escherichia coli: A Global Ecological Analysis
 
 
Article

One Health Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance Phenotypes in Selected Communities in Thailand

1
Faculty of Public Health, Ubon Ratchathani Rajabhat University, Ubon Ratchathani 34000, Thailand
2
Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand
3
Faculty of Medical Technology, Mahidol University, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand
4
Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand
5
Faculty of Veterinary Technology, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10220, Thailand
6
Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Marc Maresca
Antibiotics 2022, 11(5), 556; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11050556
Received: 2 April 2022 / Revised: 14 April 2022 / Accepted: 20 April 2022 / Published: 21 April 2022
Integrated surveillance of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) using the One Health approach that includes humans, animals, food, and the environment has been recommended by responsible international organizations. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of AMR phenotypes in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella species isolated from humans, pigs, chickens, and wild rodents in five communities in northern Thailand. Rectal swabs from 269 pigs and 318 chickens; intestinal contents of 196 wild rodents; and stool samples from 69 pig farmers, 155 chicken farmers, and 61 non-farmers were cultured for E. coli and Klebsiella species, which were then tested for resistance to ceftriaxone, colistin, and meropenem. The prevalence of ceftriaxone-resistant E. coli and Klebsiella species in pigs, chickens, rodents, pig farmers, chicken farmers, and non-farmers was 64.3%, 12.9%, 4.1%, 55.1%, 38.7%, and 36.1%, respectively. Colistin resistance in pigs, chickens, rodents, pig farmers, chicken farmers, and non-farmers was 41.3%, 9.8%, 4.6%, 34.8%, 31.6%, and 24.6%, respectively. Meropenem resistance was not detected. The observed high prevalence of AMR, especially colistin resistance, in study food animals/humans is worrisome. Further studies to identify factors that contribute to AMR, strengthened reinforcement of existing regulations on antimicrobial use, and more appropriate interventions to minimize AMR in communities are urgently needed. View Full-Text
Keywords: antimicrobial resistance phenotype; One Health surveillance; community; Thailand antimicrobial resistance phenotype; One Health surveillance; community; Thailand
MDPI and ACS Style

Sudatip, D.; Tiengrim, S.; Chasiri, K.; Kritiyakan, A.; Phanprasit, W.; Morand, S.; Thamlikitkul, V. One Health Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance Phenotypes in Selected Communities in Thailand. Antibiotics 2022, 11, 556. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11050556

AMA Style

Sudatip D, Tiengrim S, Chasiri K, Kritiyakan A, Phanprasit W, Morand S, Thamlikitkul V. One Health Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance Phenotypes in Selected Communities in Thailand. Antibiotics. 2022; 11(5):556. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11050556

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sudatip, Duangdao, Surapee Tiengrim, Kittipong Chasiri, Anamika Kritiyakan, Wantanee Phanprasit, Serge Morand, and Visanu Thamlikitkul. 2022. "One Health Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance Phenotypes in Selected Communities in Thailand" Antibiotics 11, no. 5: 556. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11050556

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop