Next Article in Journal
Effect of Functionalized Graphene Nanoplatelets on the Delamination-Buckling and Delamination Propagation Resistance of 3D Fiber-Metal Laminates Under Different Loading Rates
Next Article in Special Issue
Elucidating the Effect of Etching Time Key-Parameter toward Optically and Electrically-Active Silicon Nanowires
Previous Article in Journal
Purification of Fluorescently Derivatized N-Glycans by Magnetic Iron Nanoparticles
Previous Article in Special Issue
Carboxylic Acid Functionalization at the Meso-Position of the Bodipy Core and Its Influence on Photovoltaic Performance
Open AccessReview

Nanostructured Perovskite Solar Cells

1
Research Center for Photovoltaics, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568, Japan
2
College of Resources and Environment, Southwest University, Beibei, Chongqing 400715, China
3
School of Engineering, Ulster University, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB, UK
4
School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9AJ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(10), 1481; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9101481
Received: 26 September 2019 / Revised: 11 October 2019 / Accepted: 12 October 2019 / Published: 18 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Emerging Solar Cells)
Over the past decade, lead halide perovskites have emerged as one of the leading photovoltaic materials due to their long carrier lifetimes, high absorption coefficients, high tolerance to defects, and facile processing methods. With a bandgap of ~1.6 eV, lead halide perovskite solar cells have achieved power conversion efficiencies in excess of 25%. Despite this, poor material stability along with lead contamination remains a significant barrier to commercialization. Recently, low-dimensional perovskites, where at least one of the structural dimensions is measured on the nanoscale, have demonstrated significantly higher stabilities, and although their power conversion efficiencies are slightly lower, these materials also open up the possibility of quantum-confinement effects such as carrier multiplication. Furthermore, both bulk perovskites and low-dimensional perovskites have been demonstrated to form hybrids with silicon nanocrystals, where numerous device architectures can be exploited to improve efficiency. In this review, we provide an overview of perovskite solar cells, and report the current progress in nanoscale perovskites, such as low-dimensional perovskites, perovskite quantum dots, and perovskite-nanocrystal hybrid solar cells. View Full-Text
Keywords: solar cells; perovskites; perovskite nanocrystals; perovskite quantum dots; low-dimensional perovskites; nanocrystal solar cells; organic–inorganic hybrid solar cells; lead halide solar cells; hybrid solar cells solar cells; perovskites; perovskite nanocrystals; perovskite quantum dots; low-dimensional perovskites; nanocrystal solar cells; organic–inorganic hybrid solar cells; lead halide solar cells; hybrid solar cells
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

McDonald, C.; Ni, C.; Maguire, P.; Connor, P.; Irvine, J.T.S.; Mariotti, D.; Svrcek, V. Nanostructured Perovskite Solar Cells. Nanomaterials 2019, 9, 1481.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop