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Article

Biomimetic Transparent Eye Protection Inspired by the Carapace of an Ostracod (Crustacea)

1
Green Templeton College, University of Oxford, 43 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HG, UK
2
School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 4HQ, UK
3
Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, Physical Protection Group, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JQ, UK
4
Bay Campus, School of Management, Swansea University, Swansea SA1 8EN, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Edoardo De Tommasi
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(3), 663; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11030663
Received: 14 February 2021 / Revised: 3 March 2021 / Accepted: 5 March 2021 / Published: 8 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Properties of Nanostructured Biomaterials)
In this study we mimic the unique, transparent protective carapace (shell) of myodocopid ostracods, through which their compound eyes see, to demonstrate that the carapace ultrastructure also provides functions of strength and protection for a relatively thin structure. The bulk ultrastructure of the transparent window in the carapace of the relatively large, pelagic cypridinid (Myodocopida) Macrocypridina castanea was mimicked using the thin film deposition of dielectric materials to create a transparent, 15 bi-layer material. This biomimetic material was subjected to the natural forces withstood by the ostracod carapace in situ, including scratching by captured prey and strikes by water-borne particles. The biomimetic material was then tested in terms of its extrinsic (hardness value) and intrinsic (elastic modulus) response to indentation along with its scratch resistance. The performance of the biomimetic material was compared with that of a commonly used, anti-scratch resistant lens and polycarbonate that is typically used in the field of transparent armoury. The biomimetic material showed the best scratch resistant performance, and significantly greater hardness and elastic modulus values. The ability of biomimetic material to revert back to its original form (post loading), along with its scratch resistant qualities, offers potential for biomimetic eye protection coating that could enhance material currently in use. View Full-Text
Keywords: ostracod; biomimetics; transparency; scratch resistance; impact resistance; armoury ostracod; biomimetics; transparency; scratch resistance; impact resistance; armoury
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MDPI and ACS Style

Parker, A.R.; Palka, B.P.; Albon, J.; Meek, K.M.; Holden, S.; Malik, F.T. Biomimetic Transparent Eye Protection Inspired by the Carapace of an Ostracod (Crustacea). Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 663. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11030663

AMA Style

Parker AR, Palka BP, Albon J, Meek KM, Holden S, Malik FT. Biomimetic Transparent Eye Protection Inspired by the Carapace of an Ostracod (Crustacea). Nanomaterials. 2021; 11(3):663. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11030663

Chicago/Turabian Style

Parker, Andrew R., Barbara P. Palka, Julie Albon, Keith M. Meek, Simon Holden, and F. Tegwen Malik. 2021. "Biomimetic Transparent Eye Protection Inspired by the Carapace of an Ostracod (Crustacea)" Nanomaterials 11, no. 3: 663. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11030663

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