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Article

Ambient Climate Influences Anti-Adhesion between Biomimetic Structured Foil and Nanofibers

1
Institute for Biology II, RWTH Aachen, Worringerweg 3, 52074 Aachen, Germany
2
Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Strasse 69, 4040 Linz, Austria
3
Institute of Biomedical Mechatronics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Strasse 69, 4040 Linz, Austria
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Takuya Kitaoka
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(12), 3222; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11123222
Received: 25 October 2021 / Revised: 10 November 2021 / Accepted: 24 November 2021 / Published: 27 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanopatterning of Bionic Materials)
Due to their uniquely high surface-to-volume ratio, nanofibers are a desired material for various technical applications. However, this surface-to-volume ratio also makes processing difficult as van der Waals forces cause nanofibers to adhere to virtually any surface. The cribellate spider Uloborus plumipes represents a biomimetic paragon for this problem: these spiders integrate thousands of nanofibers into their adhesive capture threads. A comb on their hindmost legs, termed calamistrum, enables the spiders to process the nanofibers without adhering to them. This anti-adhesion is due to a rippled nanotopography on the calamistrum. Via laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), these nanostructures can be recreated on artificial surfaces, mimicking the non-stickiness of the calamistrum. In order to advance the technical implementation of these biomimetic structured foils, we investigated how climatic conditions influence the anti-adhesive performance of our surfaces. Although anti-adhesion worked well at low and high humidity, technical implementations should nevertheless be air-conditioned to regulate temperature: we observed no pronounced anti-adhesive effect at temperatures above 30 °C. This alteration between anti-adhesion and adhesion could be deployed as a temperature-sensitive switch, allowing to swap between sticking and not sticking to nanofibers. This would make handling even easier. View Full-Text
Keywords: spider silk; calamistrum; LIPSS; humidity; temperature; van der Waals; bionic; laser structuring; fiber processing; nanofibers spider silk; calamistrum; LIPSS; humidity; temperature; van der Waals; bionic; laser structuring; fiber processing; nanofibers
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MDPI and ACS Style

Meyer, M.; Buchberger, G.; Heitz, J.; Baiko, D.; Joel, A.-C. Ambient Climate Influences Anti-Adhesion between Biomimetic Structured Foil and Nanofibers. Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 3222. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11123222

AMA Style

Meyer M, Buchberger G, Heitz J, Baiko D, Joel A-C. Ambient Climate Influences Anti-Adhesion between Biomimetic Structured Foil and Nanofibers. Nanomaterials. 2021; 11(12):3222. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11123222

Chicago/Turabian Style

Meyer, Marco, Gerda Buchberger, Johannes Heitz, Dariya Baiko, and Anna-Christin Joel. 2021. "Ambient Climate Influences Anti-Adhesion between Biomimetic Structured Foil and Nanofibers" Nanomaterials 11, no. 12: 3222. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11123222

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