Next Article in Journal
A Time-Extended (24 h) Baited Remote Underwater Video (BRUV) for Monitoring Pelagic and Nocturnal Marine Species
Previous Article in Journal
Wave and Hydrodynamic Processes in the Vicinity of a Rubble-Mound, Permeable, Zero-Freeboard Breakwater
Previous Article in Special Issue
Levels of Diatom Minor Sterols Respond to Changes in Temperature and Salinity
Article

Feeding Whole Thraustochytrid Biomass to Cultured Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) Fingerlings: Culture Performance and Fatty Acid Incorporation

1
CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, GPO Box 1538, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia
2
Department of Ocean Sciences, Memorial University, St. John’s, NL A1C 5S7, Canada
3
CSIRO Agriculture & Food, Qld Biosciences Precinct, 306 Carmody Road, St Lucia, QLD 4067, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(3), 207; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8030207
Received: 19 February 2020 / Revised: 5 March 2020 / Accepted: 12 March 2020 / Published: 17 March 2020
Replacement of fish oil by 5% thraustochytrid whole cell biomass in diets for Atlantic salmon had no ill effect on fish growth performance, carcass total lipid and total fatty acid content. Carcass fatty acid composition indicated incorporation of the dietary thraustochytrid-derived fatty acids. This was confirmed by compound specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) which revealed significantly 13C-depleted (δ13C value of −24‰) ω3 long-chain (≥C20) polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3 LC-PUFAs) in the fingerlings fed the thraustochytrid biomass containing diet, reflecting the highly 13C-depleted glycerol used to grow the thraustochytrid cultures. This finding demonstrates the bioavailability of the ω3 LC-PUFA of the Australian strain thraustochytrid culture (TC) 20 from the whole cell biomass that was partly cultivated on crude glycerol produced during biodiesel manufacturing. This paper demonstrates the value of Australian thraustochytrid strains grown heterotrophically for their wider biotechnological potential including as a source of higher value lipids, in particular the health-benefitting ω3 LC-PUFA, for use in aquaculture and other applications. View Full-Text
Keywords: thraustochytrid; Atlantic salmon; compound specific stable isotope analysis; polyunsaturated fatty acids; aquaculture thraustochytrid; Atlantic salmon; compound specific stable isotope analysis; polyunsaturated fatty acids; aquaculture
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Lee Chang, K.J.; Parrish, C.C.; Simon, C.J.; Revill, A.T.; Nichols, P.D. Feeding Whole Thraustochytrid Biomass to Cultured Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) Fingerlings: Culture Performance and Fatty Acid Incorporation. J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8, 207. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8030207

AMA Style

Lee Chang KJ, Parrish CC, Simon CJ, Revill AT, Nichols PD. Feeding Whole Thraustochytrid Biomass to Cultured Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) Fingerlings: Culture Performance and Fatty Acid Incorporation. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering. 2020; 8(3):207. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8030207

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lee Chang, Kim J., Christopher C. Parrish, Cedric J. Simon, Andrew T. Revill, and Peter D. Nichols. 2020. "Feeding Whole Thraustochytrid Biomass to Cultured Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) Fingerlings: Culture Performance and Fatty Acid Incorporation" Journal of Marine Science and Engineering 8, no. 3: 207. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8030207

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop