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Biomass and Protein Yields of Field Peas and Oats Intercrop Affected by Sowing Norms and Nitrogen Fertilizer at Two Different Stages of Growth

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Institute for Vegetable Crops, Karađorđeva 71, 11420 Smederevska Palanka, Serbia
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Faculty of Agriculture, Department for Field and Vegetable Crops, University of Belgrade, Nemanjina 6, 11080 Belgrade, Serbia
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Institute for Applied Nuclear Energy, Banatska 31b, 11080 Belgrade, Serbia
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Institute for Forage Crops, Globoder, 37251 Kruševac, Serbia
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Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops, Maksima Gorkog 30, 21000 Novi Sad, Serbia
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Institute of Agricultural Economics, Volgina 15, 11060 Belgrade, Serbia
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agriculture 2021, 11(9), 871; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11090871
Received: 27 July 2021 / Revised: 2 September 2021 / Accepted: 3 September 2021 / Published: 10 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Crop Production)
In limited growing conditions, intercropped field peas and oats can represent a significant source of forage rich in protein. If applied correctly, factors such as nitrogen fertilizer, the mowing phase, and sowing norms can significantly increase the productivity of these mixtures. Field trials were conducted to examine their productivity under different nitrogen levels (0, 40, 80 kg ha−1), different sowing norms/mixtures (field peas: oats—100:15%; 100:30%), and two stages of growth (full flowering, full pod formation). Nitrogen fertilizer and different sowing norms had a significant effect on the biomass, hay, and crude protein yields. On average, the highest hay yields were achieved with 80 kg ha−1 N (4.96 t ha−1), followed by 40 kg ha−1 N (4.27 t ha−1). The highest protein yields were achieved with 40 kg ha−1 N (CP—704.1 kg ha−1), followed by 80 kg ha−1 N (CP—637.6 kg ha−1). Sowing norm 100:30% achieved higher hay yields: 100:30%—4.82 t ha−1; 100:15%—4.44 t ha−1, while 100:15% achieved higher crude protein yields: 100:15%—730.4 kg ha−1; 100:30%—692.7 kg ha−1 on average. The costs were not significantly increased with the nitrogen fertilizer, but the net profits were increased by as much as 163%, depending on the nitrogen level and the mixture. Nitrogen fertilizer also achieves higher economic efficiency for the mixture 100:15% compared to the 100:30% mixture. Mixtures of field peas and oats outperform single-grown crops and provide cost-effective feed for a short time. Using optimal seed ratios and nitrogen fertilizer can significantly increase the productivity and profitability of the feed with minimal impact on the overall production costs. View Full-Text
Keywords: additive series; cereals; forage; intercropping; legumes; mixture; nitrogen fertilizer; phenophase additive series; cereals; forage; intercropping; legumes; mixture; nitrogen fertilizer; phenophase
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MDPI and ACS Style

Krga, I.; Simić, A.; Dželetović, Ž.; Babić, S.; Katanski, S.; Nikolić, S.R.; Damnjanović, J. Biomass and Protein Yields of Field Peas and Oats Intercrop Affected by Sowing Norms and Nitrogen Fertilizer at Two Different Stages of Growth. Agriculture 2021, 11, 871. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11090871

AMA Style

Krga I, Simić A, Dželetović Ž, Babić S, Katanski S, Nikolić SR, Damnjanović J. Biomass and Protein Yields of Field Peas and Oats Intercrop Affected by Sowing Norms and Nitrogen Fertilizer at Two Different Stages of Growth. Agriculture. 2021; 11(9):871. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11090871

Chicago/Turabian Style

Krga, Ivan, Aleksandar Simić, Željko Dželetović, Snežana Babić, Snežana Katanski, Svetlana R. Nikolić, and Jelena Damnjanović. 2021. "Biomass and Protein Yields of Field Peas and Oats Intercrop Affected by Sowing Norms and Nitrogen Fertilizer at Two Different Stages of Growth" Agriculture 11, no. 9: 871. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11090871

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