Next Article in Journal
Isolated Pubic Ramus Fractures Are Serious Adverse Events for Elderly Persons: An Observational Study on 138 Patients with Fragility Fractures of the Pelvis Type I (FFP Type I)
Next Article in Special Issue
Winter Exercise and Speleotherapy for Allergy and Asthma: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial
Previous Article in Journal
Surgery for Adult Patients with Congenital Heart Disease: Results from the European Database
Previous Article in Special Issue
Relationships Between Short-Term Exposure to an Indoor Environment and Dry Eye (DE) Symptoms
 
 
Article

Association between African Dust Transport and Acute Exacerbations of COPD in Miami

1
Pulmonary and Critical Care, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL 33136, USA
2
Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL 33149, USA
3
Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL and Miami Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Miami, FL 33136, USA
4
Environmental Health Division, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Equal contributors as senior authors.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(8), 2496; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9082496
Received: 6 July 2020 / Revised: 27 July 2020 / Accepted: 29 July 2020 / Published: 3 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate, Environment, and Disease)
Background: Air pollution is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Changing climate and weather patterns can modify the levels and types of air pollutants. For example, dust outbreaks increase particulate air pollution. Objective: This paper examines the effect of Saharan dust storms on the concentration of coarse particulate matter in Miami, and its association with the risk of acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD). Methods: In this prospective cohort study, 296 COPD patients (with 313 events) were followed between 2013 and 2016. We used Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) and satellite-based Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) to identify dust events and quantify particulate matter (PM) exposure, respectively. Exacerbation events were modeled with respect to location- and time-lagged dust and PM exposures, using multivariate logistic regressions. Measurements and main results: Dust duration and intensity increased yearly during the study period. During dust events, AOD increased by 51% and particulate matter ≤2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) increased by 25%. Adjusting for confounders, ambient temperature and local PM2.5 exposure, one-day lagged dust exposure was associated with 4.9 times higher odds of two or more (2+ hereto after) AECOPD events (odds ratio = 4.9; 95% CI = 1.8–13.4; p < 0.001). Ambient temperature exposure also showed a significant association with 2+ and 3+ AECOPD events. The risk of AECOPD lasted up to 15 days after dust exposure, declining from 10× higher on day 0 to 20% higher on day 15. Conclusions: Saharan dust outbreaks observed in Miami elevate the concentration of PM and increase the risk of AECOPD in COPD patients with recurring exacerbations. View Full-Text
Keywords: Saharan dust outbreak; COPD; climate change; particulate matter; extreme weather Saharan dust outbreak; COPD; climate change; particulate matter; extreme weather
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Gutierrez, M.P.; Zuidema, P.; Mirsaeidi, M.; Campos, M.; Kumar, N. Association between African Dust Transport and Acute Exacerbations of COPD in Miami. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 2496. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9082496

AMA Style

Gutierrez MP, Zuidema P, Mirsaeidi M, Campos M, Kumar N. Association between African Dust Transport and Acute Exacerbations of COPD in Miami. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2020; 9(8):2496. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9082496

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gutierrez, Miguel Pardinas, Paquita Zuidema, Mehdi Mirsaeidi, Michael Campos, and Naresh Kumar. 2020. "Association between African Dust Transport and Acute Exacerbations of COPD in Miami" Journal of Clinical Medicine 9, no. 8: 2496. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9082496

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop