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Open AccessReview

Transition to Adult Care for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

1
Sleep Research Laboratory, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, ON M5G2A2, Canada
2
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Respirology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5G1X8, Canada
3
Sleep Laboratory, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON M5G1X8, Canada
4
Department of Medicine, Division of Respirology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5G 2N2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(12), 2120; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8122120
Received: 1 November 2019 / Revised: 26 November 2019 / Accepted: 26 November 2019 / Published: 2 December 2019
Obstructive sleep apnea may occur throughout the lifespan, with peak occurrences in early childhood and during middle and older age. Onset in childhood is overwhelmingly due to adeno-tonsillar hypertrophy, while in adulthood, contributors include risk factors, such as obesity, male sex, and aging. More recently, there has been a precipitous increase in the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in youth. Drivers of this phenomenon include both increasing obesity and the survival of children with complex medical conditions into adulthood. Appropriate treatment and long-term management of obstructive sleep apnea is critical to ensure that these youth maintain well-being unfettered by secondary comorbidities. To this end, patient engagement and seamless transition of care from pediatric to adult health care systems is of paramount importance. To date, this is an unacknowledged and unmet need in most sleep programs. This article highlights the need for guideline-driven sleep disorder transition processes and illustrates the authors’ experience with the development of a program for sleep apnea.
Keywords: obstructive sleep apnea; healthcare transition; transition to adult care; young adults, adolescents; sleep medicine obstructive sleep apnea; healthcare transition; transition to adult care; young adults, adolescents; sleep medicine
MDPI and ACS Style

Heffernan, A.; Malik, U.; Cheng, R.; Yo, S.; Narang, I.; Ryan, C.M. Transition to Adult Care for Obstructive Sleep Apnea. J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8, 2120.

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