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Disordered Eating Behaviours and Eating Disorders in Women in Australia with and Without Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Cross-Sectional Study
Open AccessArticle

Perinatal Mental Health in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of an Australian Population-Based Cohort

1
Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Clayton VIC 3168, Australia
2
Department of Diabetes and Vascular Medicine, Monash Health, Clayton VIC 3168, Australia
3
The Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, Monash University and the Alfred Hospital, Melbourne VIC 3004, Australia
4
Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW 2308, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(12), 2070; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8122070
Received: 29 October 2019 / Revised: 14 November 2019 / Accepted: 22 November 2019 / Published: 25 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Phenotype and Treatment)
Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have many risk factors associated with perinatal mental disorders, but research in this area is scarce. This study aims to compare the prevalence of common perinatal mental disorders in women with and without PCOS, and examine the relationship between PCOS and common perinatal mental disorders. We performed a cross-sectional study on self-reported data of 5239 women born between 1973 to 1978 in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health. Compared with women not reporting PCOS, women reporting PCOS had higher prevalence of antenatal depression (8.9% vs. 4.4%, p < 0.001), antenatal anxiety (11.7% vs. 5.6%, p < 0.001), postnatal depression (26.8% vs. 18.6%, p < 0.001) and postnatal anxiety (18.4% vs. 12.0%, p < 0.001). PCOS was positively associated with antenatal depression and/or anxiety (adjusted odds ratio 1.8, 95% confidence interval 1.2–2.6) but not postnatal depression and/or anxiety after controlling for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, reproductive history, obstetric complications and pre-existing depression and anxiety. General perinatal guidelines currently do not recognize PCOS as a risk factor and the international evidence based PCOS guideline noted inadequate evidence in this area. This paper addresses the gap in literature and highlights the need to screen for common perinatal mental disorders in women with PCOS. View Full-Text
Keywords: polycystic ovary syndrome; perinatal mental health; depression; anxiety polycystic ovary syndrome; perinatal mental health; depression; anxiety
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Tay, C.T.; Teede, H.J.; Boyle, J.A.; Kulkarni, J.; Loxton, D.; Joham, A.E. Perinatal Mental Health in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of an Australian Population-Based Cohort. J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8, 2070.

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