Next Article in Journal
Gender Disparities in Vascular Access and One-Year Mortality among Incident Hemodialysis Patients: An Epidemiological Study in Lazio Region, Italy
Previous Article in Journal
Do Metabolically Healthy People with Obesity Have a Lower Health-Related Quality of Life? A Prospective Cohort Study in Taiwan
Article

Association of Serum High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol with High Blood Pressures at Checkup: Results of Kanagawa Investigation of Total Checkup Data from the National Database-9 (KITCHEN-9)

1
School of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Social Services, Kanagawa University of Human Services, 1-10-1 Heisei-cho, Yokosuka 238-8522, Japan
2
Saitama Medical Center, Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Saitama Medical University, 1981 Kamoda, Kawagoe 350-8550, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Francesca Mallamaci and Giovanni Tarantino
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(21), 5118; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10215118
Received: 20 September 2021 / Revised: 19 October 2021 / Accepted: 28 October 2021 / Published: 30 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Endocrinology & Metabolism)
Background: although high-density lipoprotein has cardioprotective effects, the association between serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and hypertension is poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated whether high and low concentrations of HDL-C are associated with high blood pressure (HBP) using a large healthcare dataset. Methods: in a community-based cross-sectional study of 1,493,152 Japanese people (830,669 men and 662,483 women) aged 40–74 years who underwent a health checkup, blood pressures automatically measured at healthcare center were investigated in nine HDL-C groups (20–110 mg/dL or over). Results: crude U-shaped relationship were observed between the nine HDL-C and blood pressures in both men and women. Logistic regression analysis showed left-to-right inverted J-shaped relationships between HDL-C and odds ratios for HBP (≥140/90 mmHg and/or pharmacotherapy), with lower limits of 90–99 mg/dL in both sexes, which were unchanged after adjusting for confounding factors. However, further adjustment for body mass index and serum triglyceride concentration revealed positive linear associations between HDL-C and HBP, although blunt U-shaped associations remained in nonalcohol drinkers. Conclusion: both low and extremely high HDL-C concentrations are associated with HBP. The former association might be dependent on excess fat mass concomitant with low HDL-C, whereas the latter association may be largely dependent on frequent alcohol consumption. View Full-Text
Keywords: high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; hypertension; blood pressure; low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; extremely high high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; body mass index; big data high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; hypertension; blood pressure; low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; extremely high high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; body mass index; big data
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Nakajima, K.; Igata, M.; Higuchi, R.; Tanaka, K.; Mizusawa, K.; Nakamura, T. Association of Serum High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol with High Blood Pressures at Checkup: Results of Kanagawa Investigation of Total Checkup Data from the National Database-9 (KITCHEN-9). J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 5118. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10215118

AMA Style

Nakajima K, Igata M, Higuchi R, Tanaka K, Mizusawa K, Nakamura T. Association of Serum High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol with High Blood Pressures at Checkup: Results of Kanagawa Investigation of Total Checkup Data from the National Database-9 (KITCHEN-9). Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2021; 10(21):5118. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10215118

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nakajima, Kei, Manami Igata, Ryoko Higuchi, Kotone Tanaka, Kaori Mizusawa, and Teiji Nakamura. 2021. "Association of Serum High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol with High Blood Pressures at Checkup: Results of Kanagawa Investigation of Total Checkup Data from the National Database-9 (KITCHEN-9)" Journal of Clinical Medicine 10, no. 21: 5118. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10215118

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop