Next Article in Journal
Dietary Antioxidants and Parkinson’s Disease
Previous Article in Journal
Innovative and Conventional Valorizations of Grape Seeds from Winery By-Products as Sustainable Source of Lipophilic Antioxidants
Previous Article in Special Issue
Risk Associated with the LEPR rs8179183 GG Genotype in a Female Korean Population with Obesity
Open AccessArticle

The Impact of Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption on the Liver: A Proteomics-based Analysis

1
Center for Cardio-Metabolic Research in Africa (CARMA), Department of Physiological Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch 7600, South Africa
2
Applied Microbial and Health Biotechnology Institute, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Bellville 7535, Cape Town, South Africa
3
Faculty of Health and Wellness Sciences, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Bellville 7535, Cape Town, South Africa
4
Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
5
Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology & Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antioxidants 2020, 9(7), 569; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9070569
Received: 1 June 2020 / Revised: 15 June 2020 / Accepted: 19 June 2020 / Published: 1 July 2020
Cardiometabolic complications such as the metabolic syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) are major causes of global morbidity and mortality. As sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) are implicated in this process, this study aimed to obtain greater mechanistic insights. Male Wistar rats (~200 g) were gavaged with a local SSB every day for a period of six months while the control group was gavaged with an iso-volumetric amount of water. Experimental dosages were calculated according to the surface area-to-volume ratio and were equivalent to 125 mL/day (in human terms). A proteomic analysis was performed on isolated liver samples and thereafter, markers of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, antioxidant/oxidant capacity, calcium regulation, and mitochondrial functionality were assessed. These data show that SSB consumption resulted in (a) the induction of mild hepatic ER stress; (b) altered hepatic mitochondrial dynamics; and (c) perturbed calcium handling across mitochondria-associated ER membranes. Despite significant changes in markers of ER stress, the antioxidant response and calcium handling (proteomics data), the liver is able to initiate adaptive responses to counteract such stressors. However, the mitochondrial data showed increased fission and decreased fusion that may put the organism at risk for developing insulin resistance and T2DM in the longer term. View Full-Text
Keywords: sugar-sweetened beverages; metabolic syndrome; endoplasmic reticulum stress; mitochondrial dysfunction; mitochondrial fission and fusion; antioxidant capacity; calcium homeostasis sugar-sweetened beverages; metabolic syndrome; endoplasmic reticulum stress; mitochondrial dysfunction; mitochondrial fission and fusion; antioxidant capacity; calcium homeostasis
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

  • Supplementary File 1:

    ZIP-Document (ZIP, 1492 KB)

  • Externally hosted supplementary file 1
    Doi: 10.5281/zenodo.1234567
    Link: https://zenodo.or/record/1234567
    Description: Tables S1 and S2: Proteins exhibiting SSB-induced decreases and increases in expression (listed from highest to lowest).
MDPI and ACS Style

Benade, J.; Sher, L.; De Klerk, S.; Deshpande, G.; Bester, D.; Marnewick, J.L.; Sieck, G.; Laher, I.; Essop, M.F. The Impact of Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption on the Liver: A Proteomics-based Analysis. Antioxidants 2020, 9, 569.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop