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Optimising Cognitive Enhancement: Systematic Assessment of the Effects of tDCS Duration in Older Adults

Department of Psychology, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK
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Brain Sci. 2020, 10(5), 304; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10050304
Received: 24 April 2020 / Revised: 13 May 2020 / Accepted: 14 May 2020 / Published: 16 May 2020
Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to support cognition and brain function in older adults. However, there is an absence of research specifically designed to determine optimal stimulation protocols, and much of what is known about subtle distinctions in tDCS parameters is based on young adult data. As the first systematic exploration targeting older adults, this study aimed to provide insight into the effects of variations in stimulation duration. Anodal stimulation of 10 and 20 min, as well as a sham-control variant, was administered to dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Stimulation effects were assessed in relation to a novel attentional control task. Ten minutes of anodal stimulation significantly improved task-switching speed from baseline, contrary to the sham-control and 20 min variants. The findings represent a crucial step forwards for methods development, and the refinement of stimulation to enhance executive function in the ageing population. View Full-Text
Keywords: transcranial direct current stimulation; non-invasive brain stimulation; stimulation duration; aging; neural plasticity; attentional control transcranial direct current stimulation; non-invasive brain stimulation; stimulation duration; aging; neural plasticity; attentional control
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Hanley, C.J.; Alderman, S.L.; Clemence, E. Optimising Cognitive Enhancement: Systematic Assessment of the Effects of tDCS Duration in Older Adults. Brain Sci. 2020, 10, 304.

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