Next Article in Journal
Increased Resting State Triple Network Functional Connectivity in Undergraduate Problematic Cannabis Users: A Preliminary EEG Coherence Study
Previous Article in Journal
Preclinical Intracranial Aneurysm Models: A Systematic Review
Open AccessFeature PaperReview

Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury in the United States: Rural-Urban Disparities and Considerations

1
Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
2
Brain and Spinal Injury Center, Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, CA 94110, USA
3
Department of Neurological Surgery, Columbia University of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10027, USA
4
Department of Neurological Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Brain Sci. 2020, 10(3), 135; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10030135
Received: 10 January 2020 / Revised: 27 February 2020 / Accepted: 27 February 2020 / Published: 28 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Disparities in Traumatic Brain Injury)
Introduction: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a primary cause of pediatric morbidity. The improved characterization of healthcare disparities for pediatric TBI in United States (U.S.) rural communities is needed to advance care. Methods: The PubMed database was queried using keywords ((“brain/head trauma” OR “brain/head injury”) AND “rural/underserved” AND “pediatric/child”). All qualifying articles focusing on rural pediatric TBI, including the subtopics epidemiology (N = 3), intervention/healthcare cost (N = 6), and prevention (N = 1), were reviewed. Results: Rural pediatric TBIs were more likely to have increased trauma and head injury severity, with higher-velocity mechanisms (e.g., motor vehicle collisions). Rural patients were at risk of delays in care due to protracted transport times, inclement weather, and mis-triage to non-trauma centers. They were also more likely than urban patients to be unnecessarily transferred to another hospital, incurring greater costs. In general, rural centers had decreased access to mental health and/or specialist care, while the average healthcare costs were greater. Prevention efforts, such as mandating bicycle helmet use through education by the police department, showed improved compliance in children aged 5–12 years. Conclusions: U.S. rural pediatric patients are at higher risk of dangerous injury mechanisms, trauma severity, and TBI severity compared to urban. The barriers to care include protracted transport times, transfer to less-resourced centers, increased healthcare costs, missing data, and decreased access to mental health and/or specialty care during hospitalization and follow-up. Preventative efforts can be successful and will require an improved multidisciplinary awareness and education. View Full-Text
Keywords: concussion; cost; epidemiology; health disparity; rural; traumatic brain injury; underserved concussion; cost; epidemiology; health disparity; rural; traumatic brain injury; underserved
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Yue, J.K.; Upadhyayula, P.S.; Avalos, L.N.; Cage, T.A. Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury in the United States: Rural-Urban Disparities and Considerations. Brain Sci. 2020, 10, 135.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop