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Cannabis and Cognition: Connecting the Dots towards the Understanding of the Relationship
Open AccessArticle

Increased Resting State Triple Network Functional Connectivity in Undergraduate Problematic Cannabis Users: A Preliminary EEG Coherence Study

1
Cognitive and Clinical Psychology Laboratory, Department of Human Science, European University of Rome, Italy, Via degli Aldobrandeschi 190, 00163 Roma, Italy
2
Laboratorio de Neurociencias Moleculares e Integrativas, Escuela de Medicina, División Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Anáhuac Mayab, Mérida 97302, Yucatán, Mexico
3
Laboratory of Physical Activity Neuroscience, Physical Activity Sciences Postgraduate Program–Salgado de Oliveira University (UNIVERSO), Niterói 24030-060, RJ, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2020, 10(3), 136; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10030136
Received: 21 January 2020 / Revised: 22 February 2020 / Accepted: 25 February 2020 / Published: 28 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cannabis: Neuropsychiatry and Its Effects on Brain and Behavior)
An increasing body of experimental data have suggested that aberrant functional interactions between large-scale networks may be the most plausible explanation of psychopathology across multiple mental disorders, including substance-related and addictive disorders. In the current research, we have investigated the association between problematic cannabis use (PCU) and triple-network electroencephalographic (EEG) functional connectivity. Twelve participants with PCU and 24 non-PCU participants were included in the study. EEG recordings were performed during resting state (RS). The exact Low-Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography software (eLORETA) was used for all EEG analyses. Compared to non-PCU, PCU participants showed an increased delta connectivity between the salience network (SN) and central executive network (CEN), specifically, between the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and right posterior parietal cortex. The strength of delta connectivity between the SN and CEN was positively and significantly correlated with higher problematic patterns of cannabis use after controlling for age, sex, educational level, tobacco use, problematic alcohol use, and general psychopathology (rp = 0.40, p = 0.030). Taken together, our results show that individuals with PCU could be characterized by a specific dysfunctional interaction between the SN and CEN during RS, which might reflect the neurophysiological underpinnings of attentional and emotional processes of cannabis-related thoughts, memories, and craving. View Full-Text
Keywords: problematic cannabis use; triple network; EEG functional connectivity; eLORETA; resting state problematic cannabis use; triple network; EEG functional connectivity; eLORETA; resting state
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Imperatori, C.; Massullo, C.; Carbone, G.A.; Panno, A.; Giacchini, M.; Capriotti, C.; Lucarini, E.; Ramella Zampa, B.; Murillo-Rodríguez, E.; Machado, S.; Farina, B. Increased Resting State Triple Network Functional Connectivity in Undergraduate Problematic Cannabis Users: A Preliminary EEG Coherence Study. Brain Sci. 2020, 10, 136.

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