Next Article in Journal
Phthalates Exposure and Occupational Symptoms among Slovakian Hairdressing Apprentices
Previous Article in Journal
The Impact of Space-Based AIS Antenna Orientation on In-Orbit AIS Detection Performance
Previous Article in Special Issue
FEM-Based Compression Fracture Risk Assessment in Osteoporotic Lumbar Vertebra L1
Open AccessArticle

A Comparative Study of Continuum and Structural Modelling Approaches to Simulate Bone Adaptation in the Pelvic Construct

1
The Royal British Legion Centre for Blast Injury Studies, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
2
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Structural Biomechanics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(16), 3320; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9163320
Received: 27 June 2019 / Revised: 29 July 2019 / Accepted: 7 August 2019 / Published: 13 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomaterials for Bone Tissue Engineering)
  |  
PDF [8188 KB, uploaded 13 August 2019]
  |  

Abstract

This study presents the development of a number of finite element (FE) models of the pelvis using different continuum and structural modelling approaches. Four FE models were developed using different modelling approaches: continuum isotropic, continuum orthotropic, hybrid isotropic and hybrid orthotropic. The models were subjected to an iterative adaptation process based on the Mechanostat principle. Each model was adapted to a number of common daily living activities (walking, stair ascent, stair descent, sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit) by applying onto it joint and muscle loads derived using a musculoskeletal modelling framework. The resulting models, along with a structural model previously developed by the authors, were compared visually in terms of bone architecture, and their response to a single load case was compared to a continuum FE model derived from computed tomography (CT) imaging data. The main findings of this study were that the continuum orthotropic model was the closest to the CT derived model in terms of load response albeit having less total bone volume, suggesting that the role of material directionality in influencing the maximum orthotropic Young’s modulus should be included in continuum bone adaptation models. In addition, the hybrid models, where trabecular and cortical bone were distinguished, had similar outcomes, suggesting that the approach to modelling trabecular bone is less influential when the cortex is modelled separately. View Full-Text
Keywords: biomechanics; finite element modelling; pelvis; bone adaptation; musculoskeletal modelling biomechanics; finite element modelling; pelvis; bone adaptation; musculoskeletal modelling
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Zaharie, D.T.; Phillips, A.T. A Comparative Study of Continuum and Structural Modelling Approaches to Simulate Bone Adaptation in the Pelvic Construct. Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 3320.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Appl. Sci. EISSN 2076-3417 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top