Next Article in Journal
Awareness of Medication-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaws amongst Dental Professionals in Poland
Next Article in Special Issue
A Case Study: Simulation Traffic Model as a Tool to Assess One-Way vs. Two-Way Traffic on Urban Roads around the City Center
Previous Article in Journal
Facile Synthesis and Characterization of [email protected] Catalyst for the Suzuki-Miyaura and Mizoroki-Heck Coupling Reactions
Previous Article in Special Issue
Autonomous Vehicles: An Analysis Both on Their Distinctiveness and the Potential Impact on Urban Transport Systems
Article

Simulation-Based Public Transport Priority Tailored to Passenger Conflict Flows: A Case Study of the City of Zagreb

1
Faculty of Transport and Traffic Sciences, University of Zagreb, HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia
2
Prometis Ltd., HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Roland Jachimowski
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(11), 4820; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11114820
Received: 30 April 2021 / Revised: 21 May 2021 / Accepted: 21 May 2021 / Published: 24 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Transport Systems Efficiency, Network Planning and Safety)
Prioritizing public transport is one of the most effective measure to increase the attractiveness and competitiveness of public transport in relation to individual vehicles. The main goal of this study was to examine the possibilities for reducing the travel time of tram vehicles by giving priority at signalized intersections in terms of sharing the traffic lane with personal vehicles and under conditions of strong conflict flows with private transport. For this purpose, we used the simulation tool VISSIM and its module EPICS. A methodology for determining weighting factors for prioritizing public transport flows was developed based on conflicting passenger flows in public transport vehicles and passenger cars. Three scenarios were tested in the study area: (1) “do nothing”; (2) unconditional priority; and (3) conditional priority. The results showed that unconditional priority led to unsustainable traffic conditions for personal vehicles and public transport. In contrast, conditional priority reduced the travel time of public transport on certain corridors by between 7.64% and 18.76% in the morning peak period, and 5.60% to 22.50% in the afternoon peak period. View Full-Text
Keywords: public transport priority; VISSIM; EPICS; weighting factors; unconditional priority; conditional priority public transport priority; VISSIM; EPICS; weighting factors; unconditional priority; conditional priority
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Novačko, L.; Babojelić, K.; Dedić, L.; Rožić, T. Simulation-Based Public Transport Priority Tailored to Passenger Conflict Flows: A Case Study of the City of Zagreb. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 4820. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11114820

AMA Style

Novačko L, Babojelić K, Dedić L, Rožić T. Simulation-Based Public Transport Priority Tailored to Passenger Conflict Flows: A Case Study of the City of Zagreb. Applied Sciences. 2021; 11(11):4820. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11114820

Chicago/Turabian Style

Novačko, Luka, Karlo Babojelić, Luka Dedić, and Tomislav Rožić. 2021. "Simulation-Based Public Transport Priority Tailored to Passenger Conflict Flows: A Case Study of the City of Zagreb" Applied Sciences 11, no. 11: 4820. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11114820

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop