Next Article in Journal
An Integrated Approach to Biomedical Term Identification Systems
Next Article in Special Issue
Microalgae Water Bioremediation: Trends and Hot Topics
Previous Article in Journal
Computational Atomistic Modeling in Carbon Flatland and Other 2D Nanomaterials
Article

Nannochloropsis oceanica Cultivation in Pilot-Scale Raceway Ponds—From Design to Cultivation

1
Allmicroalgae Natural Products S.A., R&D Department, Rua 25 de Abril 19, 2445-287 Pataias, Portugal
2
LEPABE—Laboratory for Process Engineering, Environment, Biotechnology and Energy, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
3
CCMAR—Centre of Marine Sciences, University of Algarve, Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(5), 1725; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10051725
Received: 31 January 2020 / Revised: 19 February 2020 / Accepted: 20 February 2020 / Published: 3 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physiology and Biotechnology of Microalgae)
Raceways ponds are the microalgal production systems most commonly used at industrial scale. In this work, two different raceway configurations were tested under the same processing conditions to compare their performance on the production of Nannochloropsis oceanica. Biomass productivity, biochemical composition of the produced biomass, and power requirements to operate those reactors were evaluated. Water depths of 0.20 and 0.13 m, and culture circulation velocities of 0.30 and 0.15 m s−1 were tested. A standard configuration, which had a full channel width paddlewheel, proved to be the most energy efficient, consuming less than half of the energy required by a modified configuration (had a half channel width paddlewheel). The later showed to have slightly higher productivity, not enough to offset the large difference in energetic consumption. Higher flow velocity (0.30 m s−1) led to a 1.7 g m−2 d−1 improvement of biomass productivity of the system, but it increased the energy consumption twice as compared to the 0.15 m s−1 flow velocity. The latter velocity showed to be the most productive in lipids. A water depth of 0.20 m was the most suitable option tested to cultivate microalgae, since it allowed a 54% energy saving. Therefore, a standard raceway pond using a flow velocity of 0.3 m s−1 with a 0.20 m water depth was the most efficient system for microalgal cultivation. Conversely, a flow velocity of 0.15 m s−1 was the most suitable to produce lipids. View Full-Text
Keywords: raceway pond configuration; biomass productivity; energy costs; Nannochloropsis oceanica raceway pond configuration; biomass productivity; energy costs; Nannochloropsis oceanica
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Cunha, P.; Pereira, H.; Costa, M.; Pereira, J.; Silva, J.T.; Fernandes, N.; Varela, J.; Silva, J.; Simões, M. Nannochloropsis oceanica Cultivation in Pilot-Scale Raceway Ponds—From Design to Cultivation. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 1725. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10051725

AMA Style

Cunha P, Pereira H, Costa M, Pereira J, Silva JT, Fernandes N, Varela J, Silva J, Simões M. Nannochloropsis oceanica Cultivation in Pilot-Scale Raceway Ponds—From Design to Cultivation. Applied Sciences. 2020; 10(5):1725. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10051725

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cunha, Pedro, Hugo Pereira, Margarida Costa, João Pereira, Joana T. Silva, Nuno Fernandes, João Varela, Joana Silva, and Manuel Simões. 2020. "Nannochloropsis oceanica Cultivation in Pilot-Scale Raceway Ponds—From Design to Cultivation" Applied Sciences 10, no. 5: 1725. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10051725

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop