Next Article in Journal
Essential Oils as a Feed Additives: Pharmacokinetics and Potential Toxicity in Monogastric Animals
Next Article in Special Issue
Flexible Use of Urban Resources by the Yellow Mongoose Cynictis penicillata
Previous Article in Journal
Genome-Wide Linkage Disequilibrium and the Extent of Effective Population Sizes in Six Chinese Goat Populations Using a 50K Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Panel
Previous Article in Special Issue
Space Use and Movement of Urban Bobcats
Article

Large Terrestrial Bird Adapting Behavior in an Urbanized Zone

University of São Paulo, Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture, Forest Sciences Department, Wildlife Ecology, Management and Conservation Lab (LEMaC). Pádua Dias, Av., P.O. Box 09, Piracicaba/SP 13418-900, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Animals 2019, 9(6), 351; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9060351
Received: 15 May 2019 / Revised: 5 June 2019 / Accepted: 6 June 2019 / Published: 13 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Behaviour and Management of Urban Wildlife)
As the world becomes increasingly urbanized and encroaches on natural environments, wildlife face pressure to adapt to human activities. Understanding the adaptation processes of wildlife living in urban areas is an important step in the implementation of management decisions and regulatory policies, which should aim to minimise human–wildlife conflicts in cities. We investigated a rare case of the Red-legged Seriema, a large-sized terrestrial bird, occurring in an urbanized zone in a Neotropical city. We described their behaviors and assessed their distribution based on hundreds of data provided by citizen scientists. We discovered that Seriemas are occurring in the same space occupied by many free-ranging cats within the study area, which are being supported by humans offering food provisions. Humans are also providing food for Seriemas directly. The species is also benefiting from using human-made structures to improve their behavior related to territory defense and opportunistic foraging. However, some are still unable to avoid car collisions, which is a threat to their persistence in this area. Our study suggests that humans may be contributing to the domestication process of Seriemas, which may lead to them losing fear of humans, but not necessarily acquiring behavior that is advantageous to survival in cities.
Wildlife living within urban ecosystems have to adapt or perish. Red-legged Seriema, a large terrestrial bird, are rare in urban ecosystems, however, they have been reported in a medium-sized Brazilian city. We investigated the reasons for this occurrence as well as their behavior. We assessed the distribution of Seriemas (including fledglings), free-ranging cats, and cat-feeding points provided by humans, and past records of Seriemas in the study area. We discovered that Seriemas are sharing spatial resources with cats without apparent conflicts, and intraspecific competition was important to define the spatial distribution of Seriemas. This species is able to use human-made structures to improve territory defense and opportunistic foraging. Direct and indirect human food provisioning is helping them to survive in the studied area, but is also facilitating the domestication process, which may cause future conflicts with humans and cats. Although Seriemas have inhabited the studied urban area for years, they are still adapting their behaviors for urban life, as they have not yet perceived the dangers of automotive traffic. Our study corroborates that wild species may adapt to urban areas driven by human contact, but it also acts as a trap for the adaptive process. View Full-Text
Keywords: collaborative citizen science; participatory science; human-modified landscape; home range; ornithology; bird banding; bird re-sighting; avian ecology; human–wildlife conflicts; urban wildlife collaborative citizen science; participatory science; human-modified landscape; home range; ornithology; bird banding; bird re-sighting; avian ecology; human–wildlife conflicts; urban wildlife
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Alexandrino, E.R.; Bogoni, J.A.; Navarro, A.B.; Bovo, A.A.A.; Gonçalves, R.M.; Charters, J.D.; Domini, J.A.; Ferraz, K.M.P.M.B. Large Terrestrial Bird Adapting Behavior in an Urbanized Zone. Animals 2019, 9, 351. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9060351

AMA Style

Alexandrino ER, Bogoni JA, Navarro AB, Bovo AAA, Gonçalves RM, Charters JD, Domini JA, Ferraz KMPMB. Large Terrestrial Bird Adapting Behavior in an Urbanized Zone. Animals. 2019; 9(6):351. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9060351

Chicago/Turabian Style

Alexandrino, Eduardo R., Juliano A. Bogoni, Ana B. Navarro, Alex A.A. Bovo, Rafael M. Gonçalves, Jacob D. Charters, Juan A. Domini, and Katia M.P.M.B. Ferraz 2019. "Large Terrestrial Bird Adapting Behavior in an Urbanized Zone" Animals 9, no. 6: 351. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9060351

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop