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Open AccessArticle

Effects of Dietary Selenium Deficiency or Excess on Selenoprotein Gene Expression in the Spleen Tissue of Pigs

1
Institute of Animal Nutrition, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030, China
2
Department of Animal Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Animals 2019, 9(12), 1122; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9121122
Received: 21 November 2019 / Revised: 8 December 2019 / Accepted: 9 December 2019 / Published: 11 December 2019
Selenium (Se) is an essential nutrient for humans and many other species including pigs, and it plays an important role in many aspects of biological functions especially in the immune system. The metabolic roles of Se implement its biological function through its incorporation into selenoproteins, that contain a unique amino acid selenocysteine (Sec). Although 24–25 selenoprotein genes have been identified in mammals as the most important immune organ, the expression pattern of selenoproteins in the spleen of pigs regulated by different Se levels remains poorly known. The present study is conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary Se deficiency and excess on the mRNA expression levels of selenoproteins in pig spleen tissues. The results show that dietary Se levels can significantly affect the transcription levels of 14 selenoprotein genes in the spleen of pigs, which can help us to understand the biological functions of Se further and improve the use of Se in livestock production.
To evaluate the effects of dietary Se deficiency and excess on the mRNA levels of selenoproteins in pig spleen tissues, 20 healthy uncastrated boars (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire, 10 ± 0.72 kg) were randomly divided into four groups (5 pigs per group). The pigs were fed a Se deficient corn-soybean basal feed (Se content <0.03 mg/kg) or basal feed with added sodium selenite at 0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg Se/kg diet, respectively. The experiment lasted 16 weeks. The spleen tissue was collected to examine the mRNA expression levels of 24 selenoprotein genes at the end of the study. Compared with pigs in other groups, those fed with the 1.0 mg Se/kg diet had higher mRNA levels of glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1), glutathione peroxidase 2 (Gpx2), deiodinase type II (Dio2), thioredoxin reductase 3 (Txnrd3), selenoprotein H (Selh), selenoprotein N, 1 (Sepn1), selenoprotein P1 (Sepp1), and selenoprotein V (Selv) in the spleen (p < 0.05). Dietary Se deficiency resulted in lower mRNA levels of Gpx1, Gpx2, glutathione peroxidase 3 (Gpx3), Dio2, thioredoxin reductase 2 (Txnrd2), Txnrd3, Selh, selenoprotein I (Seli), selenoprotein K (Selk), selenoprotein M (Selm), Sepn1, Sepp1, and Selv in the spleen than the other three groups. Dietary Se levels did not affect the mRNA levels of glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4), deiodinase type I (Dio1), deiodinase type III (Dio3), selenophosphate synthetase 2 (Sephs2), thioredoxin reductase 1 (Txnrd1), selenoprotein O (Selo), selenoprotein S (Sels), selenoprotein W (Selw), selenoprotein X (Selx), and selenoprotein 15 (Sel15) in the spleen (p > 0.05). Dietary Se levels can affect the transcription levels of 14 selenoprotein genes in the spleen of pigs. View Full-Text
Keywords: pig; spleen; selenium; selenoprotein pig; spleen; selenium; selenoprotein
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Lu, Z.; Wang, P.; Teng, T.; Shi, B.; Shan, A.; Lei, X.G. Effects of Dietary Selenium Deficiency or Excess on Selenoprotein Gene Expression in the Spleen Tissue of Pigs. Animals 2019, 9, 1122.

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