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Open AccessArticle

Effects of Feeding Dried Fruit Pomaces as Additional Fibre-Phenolic Compound on Meat Quality, Blood Chemistry and Redox Status of Broilers

1
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Torino, Largo Paolo Braccini 2, 10095 Grugliasco, Torino, Italy
2
Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, 10-748 Olsztyn, Poland
3
Department of Poultry Science, University of Warmia and Mazury, ul. Oczapowskiego 5, 10-919 Olsztyn, Poland
4
Department of Agricultural, Forest and Food Sciences, University of Torino, Largo Paolo Braccini 2, 10095 Grugliasco, Torino, Italy
5
Department of Surgery and Pathology, University Miguel Hernandez of Elche, Research Team on Occupational Therapy (InTeO), 03550 Alicante, Spain
6
Institute of Chemical Technology of Food, Lodz University of Technology, 90-924 Lodz, Poland
7
Department of Biochemistry and Toxicology, Faculty of Biology Animal Sciences and Bioeconomy, Lublin University of Life Sciences, 20-950 Lublin, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Animals 2020, 10(11), 1968; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10111968
Received: 10 September 2020 / Revised: 20 October 2020 / Accepted: 22 October 2020 / Published: 26 October 2020
Fruit juice production resulted in a considerable amount of by-products that are rich in phenolic compounds. Several studies have already reported that polyphenols seemed to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and hypolipidemic properties. For this reason, fruit extracts have been widely used as a human food supplement for health promotion and disease prevention. However, little information about their application in animal feeds is available. The aim of this study was to investigate whether 3% or 6% apple, blackcurrant and strawberry dietary inclusion could have a positive effect on meat quality, blood chemistry and redox status of broiler chickens. Overall, the obtained results seem encouraging as both 3% and 6% fruit pomaces diets did not impair carcass traits and meat quality. Moreover, fruit pomaces groups showed lower blood triglycerides and improved renal function with lower creatinine level. Regarding antioxidant activity, all fruit pomaces improved the redox status in liver, breast and blood. No differences have been recorded between 3% and 6% diets. From a productive and biological point of view, the use of fruit pomaces in broiler chicken nutrition seems to be promising, in particular, 3% dietary inclusion seems to be preferable as higher fibre level can impair nutrient digestibility in poultry.
The present study investigated the effects of apple (A), blackcurrant (B) and strawberry (S) dried pomaces on meat quality, blood chemistry and redox status of broiler chickens. A total of 480 Ross-308 male broilers were divided into 8 dietary treatments containing 3% and 6% of cellulose preparation (C), A, B or S. Six birds/group were slaughtered at 35 days of age and blood samples were collected. Carcass traits and meat quality were determined on the Pectoralis major muscles, recording nonsignificant differences. Antioxidant activity was evaluated in serum, liver and breast muscle. In serum, fruit pomaces lowered triglycerides, creatinine and atherogenic index (p < 0.05). Regarding redox status, in serum, ACW (antioxidant capacity of water-soluble substances) and ACL (antioxidant capacity of lipid-soluble substances) were greater in A (p < 0.001). In breast, ACW and ACL were higher in B and S compared to C (p < 0.05). In liver, ACL was greater in B and S compared to C (p < 0.001) and in higher dosage compared to low (p = 0.036). GSSG (oxidized glutathione) concentration was lower in A, whereas A, B and S presented a higher GSH (reduced glutathione)/GSSG ratio. The results showed that fruit pomaces could represent promising feed ingredients for broilers, improving serum, meat and tissue antioxidant parameters. View Full-Text
Keywords: broiler; blood lipids; dried fruit pomace; phenolic compounds; tissue redox status broiler; blood lipids; dried fruit pomace; phenolic compounds; tissue redox status
MDPI and ACS Style

Colombino, E.; Zduńczyk, Z.; Jankowski, J.; Cocolin, L.S.; Schiavone, A.; Biasato, I.; Prieto-Botella, D.; Karlińska, E.; Kosmala, M.; Ognik, K.; Capucchio, M.T.; Juśkiewicz, J. Effects of Feeding Dried Fruit Pomaces as Additional Fibre-Phenolic Compound on Meat Quality, Blood Chemistry and Redox Status of Broilers. Animals 2020, 10, 1968.

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