Next Article in Journal
Effects of Atrazine on Chernozem Microbial Communities Evaluated by Traditional Detection and Modern Sequencing Technology
Next Article in Special Issue
Historical Differentiation and Recent Hybridization in Natural Populations of the Nematode-Trapping Fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora in China
Previous Article in Journal
Diverse Bacteriophages Infecting the Bacterial Striped Catfish Pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri
Previous Article in Special Issue
Screening of Rhizosphere Bacteria and Nematode Populations Associated with Soybean Roots in the Mpumalanga Highveld of South Africa
Article

Exploiting the Innate Potential of Sorghum/Sorghum–Sudangrass Cover Crops to Improve Soil Microbial Profile That Can Lead to Suppression of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes

Department of Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Ferenc Tóth, Pratik Pravin Doshi and Franciska Tóthné Bogdányi
Microorganisms 2021, 9(9), 1831; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9091831
Received: 29 July 2021 / Revised: 24 August 2021 / Accepted: 26 August 2021 / Published: 29 August 2021
Sorghum/sorghum–sudangrass hybrids (SSgH) have been used as a cover crop to improve soil health by adding soil organic matter, enhancing microbial activities, and suppressing soil-borne pathogens in various cropping systems. A series of SSgH were screened for (1) allelopathic suppression and (2) improvement of soil edaphic factors and soil microbial profile against plant-parasitic nematode (PPNs). The allelopathic potential of SSgH against PPNs is hypothesized to vary by variety and age. In two greenhouse bioassays, ‘NX-D-61′ sorghum and the ‘Latte’ SSgH amendment provided the most suppressive allelopathic effect against the female formation of Meloidogyne incognita on mustard green seedlings when using 1-, 2-, or 3-month-old SSgH tissue, though most varieties showed a decrease in allelopathic effect as SSgH mature. A field trial was conducted where seven SSgH varieties were grown for 2.5 months and terminated using a flail mower, and eggplant was planted in a no-till system. Multivariate analysis of measured parameters revealed that increase in soil moisture, microbial biomass, respiration rate, nematode enrichment index, and sorghum biomass were negatively related to the initial abundance of PPNs and the root-gall index at 5 months after planting eggplant in a no-till system. These results suggested that improvement of soil health by SSgH could lead to suppression of PPN infection. View Full-Text
Keywords: allelopathic; biofumigation; microbial profile; no-till; root-knot nematode; soil health; Meloidogyne incognita; Rotylenchulus reniformis allelopathic; biofumigation; microbial profile; no-till; root-knot nematode; soil health; Meloidogyne incognita; Rotylenchulus reniformis
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Paudel, R.; Waisen, P.; Wang, K.-H. Exploiting the Innate Potential of Sorghum/Sorghum–Sudangrass Cover Crops to Improve Soil Microbial Profile That Can Lead to Suppression of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes. Microorganisms 2021, 9, 1831. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9091831

AMA Style

Paudel R, Waisen P, Wang K-H. Exploiting the Innate Potential of Sorghum/Sorghum–Sudangrass Cover Crops to Improve Soil Microbial Profile That Can Lead to Suppression of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes. Microorganisms. 2021; 9(9):1831. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9091831

Chicago/Turabian Style

Paudel, Roshan, Philip Waisen, and Koon-Hui Wang. 2021. "Exploiting the Innate Potential of Sorghum/Sorghum–Sudangrass Cover Crops to Improve Soil Microbial Profile That Can Lead to Suppression of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes" Microorganisms 9, no. 9: 1831. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9091831

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop