Next Article in Journal
Response of Soil Fungal Diversity and Community Composition to Varying Levels of Bamboo Biochar in Red Soils
Next Article in Special Issue
Examining the Effects of the Nitrogen Environment on Growth and N2-Fixation of Endophytic Herbaspirillum seropedicae in Maize Seedlings by Applying 11C Radiotracing
Previous Article in Journal
Behavior of Listeria monocytogenes and Other Microorganisms in Sliced Riojano Chorizo (Spanish Dry-Cured Sausage) during Storage under Modified Atmospheres
Article

Beneficial Microorganisms to Control the Gray Mold of Grapevine: From Screening to Mechanisms

1
Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, RIBP EA4707 USC INRAE 1488, SFR Condorcet FR CNRS 3417, 51100 Reims, France
2
Laboratoire de Biotechnologie Végétale et Valorisation des Bio-Ressources, Faculté des Sciences, Université Moulay Ismail, Meknès B.P. 11201, Morocco
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Fred O. Asiegbu
Microorganisms 2021, 9(7), 1386; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9071386
Received: 3 June 2021 / Revised: 22 June 2021 / Accepted: 23 June 2021 / Published: 25 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Hidden World within Plants)
In many vineyards around the world, Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea) causes one of the most serious diseases of aerial grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) organs. The control of the disease relies mainly on the use of chemical products whose use is increasingly challenged. To develop new sustainable methods to better resist B. cinerea, beneficial bacteria were isolated from vineyard soil. Once screened based on their antimicrobial effect through an in vivo test, two bacterial strains, S3 and S6, were able to restrict the development of the pathogen and significantly reduced the Botrytis-related necrosis. The photosynthesis analysis showed that the antagonistic strains also prevent grapevines from considerable irreversible PSII photo-inhibition four days after infection with B. cinerea. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of S3 exhibited 100% similarity to Bacillus velezensis, whereas S6 had 98.5% similarity to Enterobacter cloacae. On the other hand, the in silico analysis of the whole genome of isolated strains has revealed the presence of “biocontrol-related” genes supporting their plant growth and biocontrol activities. The study concludes that those bacteria could be potentially useful as a suitable biocontrol agent in harvested grapevine. View Full-Text
Keywords: gray mold; biocontrol; grapevine gray mold; biocontrol; grapevine
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Amarouchi, Z.; Esmaeel, Q.; Sanchez, L.; Jacquard, C.; Hafidi, M.; Vaillant-Gaveau, N.; Ait Barka, E. Beneficial Microorganisms to Control the Gray Mold of Grapevine: From Screening to Mechanisms. Microorganisms 2021, 9, 1386. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9071386

AMA Style

Amarouchi Z, Esmaeel Q, Sanchez L, Jacquard C, Hafidi M, Vaillant-Gaveau N, Ait Barka E. Beneficial Microorganisms to Control the Gray Mold of Grapevine: From Screening to Mechanisms. Microorganisms. 2021; 9(7):1386. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9071386

Chicago/Turabian Style

Amarouchi, Zakaria, Qassim Esmaeel, Lisa Sanchez, Cédric Jacquard, Majida Hafidi, Nathalie Vaillant-Gaveau, and Essaid Ait Barka. 2021. "Beneficial Microorganisms to Control the Gray Mold of Grapevine: From Screening to Mechanisms" Microorganisms 9, no. 7: 1386. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9071386

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop